By Paul Myers

There might be nothing more frustrating in all of golf than fighting a slice. There is nowhere to hide from a bad slice, and it can seem like it rears its ugly head hole after hole. It can get old to look up from hitting your tee shot only to see your ball floating off to the right and into the trees – or worse. A bad slice has been known to chase people away from the game and just give up altogether. If you are going to avoid that fate, you’ll probably want to get a grip on your slice as soon as possible.

Read below how to fix a golf slice…

Understanding the Cause

As with any problem, it helps to understand what is at the cause of it before you are going to be able to successfully fix it. A slice can be created when the club travels through the hitting zone on an outside-to-inside path with an open club face relative to that path. Slicers sometimes push the club away from their body at the top of the backswing and pull it back in during the downswing. That can create the outside-in path needed for a slice, and the rest is history.

What to Do

It is one thing to understand where the slice is coming from, but it is another thing how to fix a golf slice. Rather than trying to fix your backswing, you might go back to the beginning of your swing and fix the takeaway portion of the move. Many slicers make the same mistake within just a few inches of starting their swing, and they never recover. If you can just eliminate that one mistake, there is a chance your slice will go away right along with it.

A Fatal Flaw in Your Takeaway

A narrow backswing can lay the ground work for a slice. Almost all good golfers have a wide backswing during which the arms are kept fairly extended out away from the body so they can drop inside on the downswing and attack the ball from a good position. If you slice, you may have a narrow backswing.

That narrow backswing can be traced back to the very start of your swing. Pay attention to how your swing is starting – are you moving the club back with your arms and shoulders, or is it being moved by your hands? When the hands are responsible for initiating the swing, one tendancy can be to flip the club head to the inside and get started on a narrow path. From there, it is may be inevitable that you are going to have a narrow backswing – and a slice as a result.

How to Fix A Golf Slice

It might seem too simple, but one fast way to possibly fix your slice is to make sure you are moving the club back with your torso, shoulders and arms rather than your hands. Think about your hands as taking a passive role during the swing while your torso turns away from the target and moves the club up into position. As long as your hands stay relatively quiet in the beginning of the backswing, and you keep your arms out away from your torso, that narrow backswing should be a thing of the past.

When you are hitting a slice, it often feels like there is no way to make it stop. However, with this simple adjustment to your takeaway, a better ball flight might be just around the corner.

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