Category Archives: golf training aids




By Paul Myers

It’s not breaking news that the golf slice is one of the biggest problems plaguing most amateur golfers. If you are stuck dealing with a slice, you may be quite frustrated with the perceived inability to fix it, and it might even have you not wanting to play as much anymore. Don’t give up on your game just because you are dealing with a golf slice – instead, develop a specific plan to fix it so you can move on and get back to enjoying the game that you love.

1) Swing Out More to the Right (for a right-handed golfer)

Assuming you hit the ball in the center of the club face and you are catching the ball at the bottom of your swing arc, for a ball to start left of the target and slice back towards the target, your swing path had to be too far left. So in order to start the ball straight at the target, you need to swing out more to the right.

This can be a bit scary to do, especially if you do not want to hit to the right. It’s like skiing, if you lean back going down the hill, it’s much more difficult to ski well…than if you lean down the hill. So it’s sort of a matter of moving in the direction of your fear.

Since what you think is swinging straight is actually left, you may have to feel like your swinging well to the right in order for it to be straight.

2) Close the Clubface-to-Path Relationship

The other thing that is going on to cause the slice as mentioned above is that the club face could have to be open to your swing path. So the other piece of the puzzle is getting the face-to-path relationship from open to closed.

There are any number of ways to accomplish this. Sometimes strengthening (turning it clockwise) your lead hand grip slightly can help. You might also start the club at address a little more closed. Or you may feel like you close the club quicker on the down swing.

However that gets accomplished doesn’t matter so much, as long as it gets done.

Center Contact

Above we mentioned having center contact. The reason that is important is because another thing that could cause the slice is hitting the ball towards the inner part (the part closest to you) of the club face.

We won’t get in to center of gravity, gear affect, and the other related science behind that, but just know that hitting the inner part of the club face can cause slicing shots. If you want to check your contact, pick up some foot powder spray from your local pharmacy or drug store, spray some on the face, make 10 drives, and see where your striking pattern is located. If it’s on the inside part of the club, you’ll know that this could be causing part of your slice.

The golf slice is a swing fault that certainly can be fixed, even if it doesn’t feel like it at the moment. Start working on your slice by trying out the three tips above and seeing how much progress you can make. It is a challenge that may take some time and practice to overcome, but it can be done.

If you liked the article about fixing your golf slice and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Windy conditions can be tough for even the best golfers, but they can be conquered if you have the right approach to golf power and understand how to deal with the challenge. After a while, you might start to enjoy playing in the wind because of the unique shots that it requires you to hit and the way the course can change throughout your round. Depending on where you live and what courses you usually play, dealing with the wind might just be a part of playing the game and improving your golf power. For others, it is a rare challenge that can catch them off guard if they don’t know how to deal with it.

You Can’t Overpower Mother Nature

Many golfer’s hopes of a good round have been destroyed by trying to overpower the wind and losing the battle. Make no mistake about it – you aren’t going to use your golf power to whip the wind, so don’t even try. A successful way to deal with the wind is to work with it, and only hit the shots that it is allowing you to hit. By stubbornly trying to hit through the wind, using all your golf power and thinking that you can hit your shots hard enough to beat the wind, you can be asking for trouble.

That doesn’t mean you can hit full, powerful shots when conditions are windy, but it’s good to know when the time is right. Downwind tee shot on a long par five? Go ahead, use your golf power and unleash your driver – you just might be able to reach the green in two shots when you would normally be well short without the wind assistance. Into the wind on a short par four? Be smart where you hit your tee shot so you can get it close for a birdie try.

Cross Winds are Trouble

Many golfers worry about the holes that play into the wind, but those aren’t so scary once you get the hang of it. By simply hitting extra club, using your golf power wisely and flighting the ball lower to the ground, you can still hit good shots when the wind is coming right into your face.

The shot some don’t want to have to deal with is the cross wind. Hitting shots with the wind blowing hard from either the right or left is a challenge that can stress out even a professional golfer. When you face this scenario, you definitely don’t want to try to overpower the hole. The harder you swing, the higher the ball is likely to go up into the air, and the more it will be affected by the wind. Rather, you might stick to the game plan of hitting controlled, lower shots and try to limit how much the wind moves the ball around. Also, consider taking a slightly wider stance to provide yourself with a more-secure base so the wind doesn’t knock you off balance.

Don’t put your clubs away for the day just because the wind has started to blow. Instead, learn how to deal with the conditions, use your golf power wisely and embrace the challenge. Not only is it possible to play good golf in the wind, it can also make you a better overall golfer by forcing you to learn and try new shots you have never tried before.

If you liked the article about how to use your golf power wisely in windy conditions and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Golf isn’t a sport that requires the same type of physical conditioning as, for example, football or basketball, but it can be a demanding game none the less. Making quality swings with enough swing speed time after time requires cooperation from a variety of muscle groups. The better conditioned your body is in as a whole, the easier it will be for you to make good swings with enough swing speed to hit the kind of shots you are looking for.

If you are committed to improving your game by adding swing speed and reaching levels you have not previously achieved, dedicating yourself to a better body is a great idea. Obviously, the benefits of fitness go well beyond the added swing speed and the fairways of the golf course, but using golf as motivation could be just what you need to get in better shape. When you do decide to hit the gym in an effort to make gains with your golf game, focusing on the muscle groups below should serve you well.

If you aren’t sure how to target these muscle groups in the gym in a golf swing specific way, there are explanations of what kinds of things you can do in the member area of Swing Man Golf…in addition to exercises for other key muscle groups.

Lower Back

The lower back area is one that gives trouble to many golfers, so adding strength and improving this area of your body through things like rack pulls could help you to stay on the course for many more years to come with capabilities of decent swing speed. Back problems are common amongst some golfers, and if you play the game long enough you may have at least minor trouble with this area at some point. While exercise won’t guarantee that you stay healthy in the lower back, it should help reduce your risk and possibly speed up recovery.

Quads, Hamstrings, Glutes, etc

The muscles in your legs help you to keep a solid base during the swing, and also are responsible for generating some power through impact, adding swing speed. Any weakness in either your quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, etc could show itself in the swing, and can make it difficult for you to hold your posture from start to finish with a decent amount of speed. Things like half squats, half leg curls, and half leg extensions are great for developing the golf swing.

Hands and Forearms

The muscles in your hands are forearms have a lot to say about how well you are able to control the club face through impact. Especially when playing from the rough, it is important to have the strength in your hands to keep the face square to your target and not let it get twisted up in the grass. Also, hand and forearm strength comes in handy when playing from bunkers where you need to create swing speed with a short swing and splash the ball up and out of the sand.

The returns in your golf game from improved fitness might not be seen immediately, but they should start to show over the long run. In addition to feeling good about being in better shape, you can also look forward to increased possibilities on the golf course (added swing speed etc.), knowing that your fitness will no longer be holding you back.

If you liked the article about most Important muscle groups for adding swing speed and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

At about 4.5 hours per round, golf is not a relatively fast game (unless you play speedgolf!). That isn’t exactly breaking news – and is something even the least-experienced golfer already knows. However, some players try to play too quickly when making their swings, and the results are not always positive. In order to gain consistency in your swing and create the same ball flight time after time, your golf tempo is an element of your game to get under control. When you get in a hurry and rush your natural tempo, all kinds of bad outcomes can result.

A sometimes tricky thing about teaching golf tempo is that, while it is important, it is also very individual in nature. Each golfer has a tempo that is unique to them, and might not work for anyone else. When working on your golf tempo, don’t necessarily copy the timing of another player – alternatively try to find the right one for you.

Fast is Fine, Rushed is Not

There is a difference between having a fast golf tempo, and a rushed one. There have been many successful golfers with fast tempos, including Nick Price. Just the same, there have been plenty of great golfers with slow looking tempos, such as Fred Couples. There is no right or wrong…try to stick closely to what comes natural to you.

However, it is not usually going to be a successful strategy to rush your golf tempo, no matter what that that tempo might be. What does it mean to rush your golf tempo? Usually, it means that you speed up right at the transition from backswing to downswing. When this happens, the sequencing in the swing gets out of whack, and hope for a solid shot can be quickly lost. It can be tempting to speed up when you make the transition because you want to hit the ball as hard as possible, but resist that urge and try to keep your tempo smooth and even from start to finish.

The Ball Isn’t Going Anywhere

Unlike baseball, where the ball is rushing past you at up to 90 miles per hour or more, the golf ball is just sitting there waiting for you to hit it. That means that you don’t have to rush, and you can let the swing accumulate speed gradually up until impact. Use that time to your advantage, and make your swing as rhythmic as possible. A swing that has a relaxed tempo – and isn’t rushed at any point – is one that will likely be more consistent and also hold up better under pressure.

It isn’t always the most-exciting thing to stand on the driving range and work on your golf tempo. In fact, it can be tricky to work on your tempo because it is almost as much mental as it is physical. Still, if you are committed to playing better golf, and maximizing your potential swing speed, practicing your golf tempo should be on your golf to-do list. Be true to yourself, develop a golf tempo that feels natural and smooth, and don’t get rushed when you put that swing into use out on the course.

If you liked the article about how rushing your golf tempo can lead to disaster in the swing and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

If you read about golf online, or watch golf on TV, you have probably seen plenty of ads for golf training aids. They are everywhere in the golf market, and some of them can actually be quite useful – others, not so much. Golf training aids run the spectrum from high-quality, well-designed products, to cheap items that are just meant to make a quick buck for the business – not help you get better at golf.

When you are considering buying a new training aid to help with your game, there are some questions that you should ask yourself before making the purchase. Following are three such questions – ask yourself each of these before you buy your next training aid.

Question #1 – What is it going to fix?

This should probably always be a question to consider, yet it is one that many golfers forget to ask when they fall in love with the latest and greatest training aid on the market. If a product isn’t going to fix a specific problem in your swing, than what good is it to you? That isn’t to say anything bad about the product – it could be well-designed and made to a high standard. But if it is designed to fix a swing flaw that you don’t have, why would you use it?

For example, there are many training aids available that try to solve the slice. Some of them are rather useful. But if you don’t fight a slice, they are probably of no use to you at all. Make sure you are thinking about your own game first, then look for a golf training aid that is designed to fix your problems – not the other way around.

Question #2 – Is this a good use of my ‘golf money’?

Many golfers have a certain amount of money in their budget set aside for golf purposes. Between paying for greens fees, buying clubs and other equipment, and practicing, golf can be an expensive sport. So you have to ask yourself, ‘is this a good use of my golf budget?’. Of course, that depends on your personal budget, and the cost of the training aid. These kinds of products can run from just a few bucks up into the hundreds. How much you can afford is up to you, but think that part through before making the purchase. Also, money that is used on a training aid could also be used to pay for golf lessons with a professional, so weigh that option as well.

Question #3 – Do I have the right place to use it?

Make sure that you will be able to properly use the training aid frequently enough to make it worthwhile. If it is a product that has to be used at the driving range, do you get out to practice enough to take advantage of it? Some golf training aids are meant for home use, which may be a better choice if you aren’t at the driving range very often. Consider the amount of time you will be able to practice with your new training aid before you decide that it is the right product to help take your game to the next level.

If you liked the article about the proper use of golf training aids and you think it would help another golfer, please

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products, click here.