Category Archives: golf tips




By Paul Myers

The title of this article might sound like a stupid question, but there is actually more to this discussion meets the eye. Obviously, you would rather have your ball finish in the golf fairway than in the rough, but at what cost? Should you always place a premium on getting on the short grass, or are there some situations where the rough would be okay as long as you get plenty of distance? The more you start the think about this topic, the more interesting it becomes.

There are generally two schools of thought on this question – those who think that the golf fairway should always be the goal, and those who think distance can trump accuracy. Let’s take a closer look at each of those two arguments.

The Argument for Accuracy

Golf shots are generally easier to control when they are hit from the golf fairway – that much we know, and can probably agree on. When the club is able to strike the ball cleanly with no long rough between the ball and the face of the club, the golfer has maximum control over the ball flight that results. Bad shots under these conditions can’t be blamed on the grass getting in the way – it is all on the golfer (unless you may have been in a divot or something like that). Therefore, putting the ball into the golf fairway is the ultimate goal for each and every tee shot.

This argument will hold the perspective that the extra yards gained by being more aggressive off the tee aren’t a benefit when the next shot has to be hit from the rough. For instance, a shot played from 150 yards to the green from the golf fairway just might be easier to deal with than a shot from 125 yards out of the rough. If the golfer is able to get closer from 150 in the fairway on a consistent basis, then it would seem they are better off playing for position.

The Argument for Distance

Closer is always better is the argument that this group will hold. It is much easier to get close to the hole when you are closer to the green, even if the shot has to be played from the rough. The equipment golfers use today allows for shots from the rough to be spun enough to hold most greens, so the golf fairway advantage may not as significant as it used to be. As long as the drive leaves the player with a clear shot at the green, it doesn’t really matter what kind of lie the player has.

The Verdict

As with most arguments, the truth is somewhere in between the two extremes in this debate, provided you aren’t giving up more than 25 yards or so of distance by being in the fairway (beyond that point, it’s normally better on average to be farther down the hole). The right choice for any individual hole, and player, depends on a number of factors. If a course has deep rough, then playing for the golf fairway might be the best choice. On a long course with light rough lining the fairways in which the style of rough could “tee” the ball up and not really have a bad lie, the aggressive club selection off the tee could be justified and work out best in the long run. You will need to assess your own game and course and decide what kind of strategy you are most comfortable with. Don’t be afraid to adjust that strategy as you go to suit the conditions that you are playing in, and the course you are playing on. Over time, you will get more comfortable with your decision making and the choices you make on the tee will become second nature.

If you liked the article about hitting the golf fairway and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Finding the optimal launch angle and golf ball flight for your driver can be a constant battle that can have a lot to do with how much distance you actually achieve on the course. Even if you have great club head speed with your driver swing, you might not get the most possible distance from the shot if your club isn’t producing optimal launch conditions. Of course, there is some debate about what kind of launch is actually best, and what will work best on the course in actually playing conditions.

High Drives = Long Carry

Sometimes, players will try to maximize their carry distance so that they can hit the golf ball plenty long even when the course gets soft. It is conceivable that if you wish to get the most distance out of your driver at all times, going for a higher launch and higher golf ball flight might be the right way to go. You will be able to carry some hazards out in the fairway, and could even consider cutting off a dogleg with a high drive that clears the trees without rolling through the fairway. However, there can be a price to pay for this strategy.

High drives have their drawbacks as well. Consider the following three points that might have you leaning more toward using a lower golf ball flight as your preferred trajectory.

  • Control. The longer the golf ball is in the air, the less control you have over where it is going. SA shot that is only a couple degrees off line can continue to get farther and farther from the fairway the longer it is in the air. If you get the ball down on the ground earlier, you can limit the damage that you experience from an off line shot, and you will may notice that you find fewer and fewer penalty shots around the course. That doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t go high…just make sure you allow for the wind’s affect on the ball from the extra time in the air.
  • Managing conditions. When the weather turns against you, whether it be rain or wind, or both, hitting a high ball off the tee can become a real problem. A good golfer is able to play well in a variety of weather conditions, and that could be problematic for you if the high drive is the only one your club is capable of hitting. Being able to flight the golf ball lower when the conditions get ugly is an ability that can be highly valuable when it is needed.
  • Loss of strategy. By using a driver that is designed and tuned to hit the golf ball high and long on each swing, you may compromise on strategy off the tee and have to adjust the ball flights that you wish to use on each hole. Taking this one size fits all approach to tee shots might work well on some courses and conditions, but may be less effective on other courses.

Ultimately, it will be up to you to choose which kind of golf ball flight you are most comfortable with on the courses that you play. There is certainly an argument to be made that a high ball flight can work well off the tee – but there are some drawbacks as well. Experiment with your equipment and swing to create different golf ball flights with your driver and settle on the one that makes you the most comfortable and gives you the best results.

If you liked the article about hitting the golf ball high or not and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Many golfers have been there – you are standing on the tee, waiting to hit your shot when your playing partner launches one long down the middle of the fairway. Suddenly, instead of thinking about the target you have picked out and making a good swing, you become obsessed with hitting it past your playing partner – and now you are in the middle of the long drive contest. Sometimes, this will result in a poor shot as you have gotten out of your own routine and started to worry about something that is out of your control. It doesn’t matter how far your playing partner hit the ball – the only thing that matters scoring-wise is executing your own swing to the best of your ability and putting the long drive contest aside.

Play Your Game

One of the beautiful things about the game of golf is that no one can play defense on your shots. Even if your playing partner hit their tee shot 400 yards down the fairway, you still have to hit your shot. To score, your goal during a round of golf is to get the ball into the hole in as few strokes as possible, regardless of how you do it. Whether you bomb a drive and hit a wedge close to the hole, or hit a short drive and a perfect six iron to the green, they can both work beautifully. The important thing is that you know your game and you stick with it regardless of what is going on around you being careful of the ‘long drive contest’ attitude.

Don’t Look

If you are playing with a particularly long hitter and find yourself getting caught up in trying to match their power, try not watching them swing on the tee to stay away from the long drive contest. You don’t need to be rude or anything – just simply look down at the ground while they hit the shot so you don’t see how fast their ball launches off the tee. Even though you will know how far they can hit it, and might even see the ball sitting out on the fairway, you may not quite feel the same pressure if you don’twatch the swing.

Enjoy the Show

On the positive side of the equation, it can be fun to watch a powerful player launch good drives hole after hole. If you can avoid letting it affect your game and get caught up in a long drive contest, it might be beneficial to watch them swing and pick up tips that you can use later on for yourself. Don’t try to make any changes with your swing right then and there during the round, but if you happen to notice something that you want to try, make a mental note and use it in your next practice session.

Don’t let the long hitter affect what you are trying to do with your game. While it might be tempting at first to see how well you can keep up with them and take part of the long drive contest, that will probably only be detrimental to your scoring game in the end. Instead, stay within yourself and do what you do best on the course – even if that means giving up a few yards off the tee.

If you liked the about long drive contests on the course and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

In a hurry to hit the ball as far as they can, some golfers rush through their driver swing. While it might feel like you are swinging harder by putting in more effort, that can actually slow the swing down and also rob you of accuracy. Most of the time, you will have more success building speed in your driver swing if take your time and use a sub-maximum tempo (maybe 90-95% or less) that keeps all of your moving parts in proper sequence to lead the club into impact just perfectly. If you have been swinging your driver “quick” up to this point, the change might take some time – but you may be very impressed with the results.

It Starts in the Takeaway

A slower not-overdoing-it driver swing starts by moving the club away a bit slower from the ball. In fact, this can be a key moment in the driver swing that sets up your tempo. When you pull the club back quickly through the first foot or so of the swing, you may be set on a path for an overly quick swing and may not be much you can do to change it at that point. A subtly slower takeaway can do you plenty of favors, including helping you stay on balance and also softly engaging your core muscles to be used through the rest of the driver swing. A fast takeaway can create a tendency to lift you up and out of your posture, making it difficult to hit a solid shot in the end. Work on a slightly slower takeaway (not sure slow, just slow enough to stay in control) and you may quickly see how much it can benefit your game.

Time at the Top

The only point in the driver swing where the club needs to be moving fast is through impact – other than that, you are free to take your time and let it build naturally. Nowhere is this more true than during the transition from backswing to downswing. This is a relatively common ‘rush’ spot in the driver swing where many amateurs see things go awry. Take your time during the transition part of your swing to make sure that you are on balance and that your lower body is leading the move down toward impact. You probably don’t want your arms and hands to lead the way – in fact, you may want them to be the last thing that comes through the zone. Feel like there is a short subtle pause at the top of your driver swing for everything to gather, and then start down with your lower body pulling the club into position.

Golf can be a paradox in a lot of ways, and hitting long drives is one of those things that may seem a little backwards. You feel like you should swing as fast and hard as possible to generate speed, but overdoing it can be counterproductive. If you can make a smooth, easy driver swing that only gets fast  right through impact, you will likely be more consistent with your power. It might take some time to get the proper feeling for how to generate easy power, but it is an amazing ability to possess once you get comfortable and put in the practice time.

If you liked the article about the driver swing and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

New golf drivers can be fun to shop for – and expensive to purchase. While most golfers love to try out the new technology on the market and see what it can do for their game, few enjoy actually pulling out their credit card to buy the club. If you are a golfer who always wants to have a new driver in the bag that you can show off to your friends, it will be a big help if you know where to look for some good deals.

Following are three different possible ways to save money on the purchase of your next new golf drivers.

Buy Used Online

This is a relatively popular option, and is certainly a good way to go, especially if you don’t mind playing clubs that are not the most recent models. Many of the used clubs you are able to find online will be at least from last year, if not older. With as rapid of a release as some companies have, you may even find heavily discounted drivers from released just a few months ago. That doesn’t mean that they can’t work great for you, but you need to know what you are looking for and pick out one that is best for you. An upside of this strategy is that you will be shopping for new or like-new golf drivers that aren’t currently getting all of the marketing attention – meaning the prices could be significantly lower than the brand new models. Be sure to do your research before making the purchase and find out how much the club has been used, what shaft it has, etc.

Trade in to the Manufacturer

If you are a golfer that stays loyal to a single club maker as you switch from model to model, you might be able to take advantage of the buyback programs that some companies are offering. Check directly on the website of your favorite club company, such as TaylorMade or Callaway, and see if they are offering a program to give you a discount on a brand new golf drivers when you trade-in your old ones. This method might not get you quite as much of a discount as you can get from buying a used driver, but you will have the benefit of getting a brand new club directly from the manufacturer…and you get some credit from your old one.

Look for Promotions

This plan won’t save you money on the purchase so much as possibly get you bonus products when you buy the driver. For example, golf shops or the club companies themselves will occasionally offer a deal where you get a free gift card when you buy a new golf driver, or get a big discount on buying a second club. One likely place to find these kinds of promotions is at your local golf shop. Take a trip around (or call) to the golf stores in your area before you buy new golf drivers to find out what might be available.

Even if you have your mind set on a specific driver, you don’t necessarily have to pay full price. As long as you are willing to consider used clubs, or to shop around for a promotional deal, you may be able to get the club you have your eye on for significantly less than full retail price.

If you liked the article about getting the best deal on a new golf driver and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Windy conditions can be tough for even the best golfers, but they can be conquered if you have the right approach to golf power and understand how to deal with the challenge. After a while, you might start to enjoy playing in the wind because of the unique shots that it requires you to hit and the way the course can change throughout your round. Depending on where you live and what courses you usually play, dealing with the wind might just be a part of playing the game and improving your golf power. For others, it is a rare challenge that can catch them off guard if they don’t know how to deal with it.

You Can’t Overpower Mother Nature

Many golfer’s hopes of a good round have been destroyed by trying to overpower the wind and losing the battle. Make no mistake about it – you aren’t going to use your golf power to whip the wind, so don’t even try. A successful way to deal with the wind is to work with it, and only hit the shots that it is allowing you to hit. By stubbornly trying to hit through the wind, using all your golf power and thinking that you can hit your shots hard enough to beat the wind, you can be asking for trouble.

That doesn’t mean you can hit full, powerful shots when conditions are windy, but it’s good to know when the time is right. Downwind tee shot on a long par five? Go ahead, use your golf power and unleash your driver – you just might be able to reach the green in two shots when you would normally be well short without the wind assistance. Into the wind on a short par four? Be smart where you hit your tee shot so you can get it close for a birdie try.

Cross Winds are Trouble

Many golfers worry about the holes that play into the wind, but those aren’t so scary once you get the hang of it. By simply hitting extra club, using your golf power wisely and flighting the ball lower to the ground, you can still hit good shots when the wind is coming right into your face.

The shot some don’t want to have to deal with is the cross wind. Hitting shots with the wind blowing hard from either the right or left is a challenge that can stress out even a professional golfer. When you face this scenario, you definitely don’t want to try to overpower the hole. The harder you swing, the higher the ball is likely to go up into the air, and the more it will be affected by the wind. Rather, you might stick to the game plan of hitting controlled, lower shots and try to limit how much the wind moves the ball around. Also, consider taking a slightly wider stance to provide yourself with a more-secure base so the wind doesn’t knock you off balance.

Don’t put your clubs away for the day just because the wind has started to blow. Instead, learn how to deal with the conditions, use your golf power wisely and embrace the challenge. Not only is it possible to play good golf in the wind, it can also make you a better overall golfer by forcing you to learn and try new shots you have never tried before.

If you liked the article about how to use your golf power wisely in windy conditions and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

One of the beautiful things about the game of golf is the never ending quest for improvement of your golf scoring. Currently a 20 handicap? You may want to get to 15. Currently a 2? You may want to get down to scratch. Some golfers are rarely, if ever, satisfied with their games and their golf scoring. That can make golf frustrating, but also keeps it interesting year after year. No golfer as of yet is playing “perfect”, so there are still adjustments and improvements to be made.

During the course of your golf journey, you may come to a point where you feel like you are stuck with your golf scoring. No matter what you try, you just can’t seem to move your handicap down or post scores that are any better than what you are used to. When you need to break through one of these mental barriers, it can be helpful to take a new look at a few areas of your game. Use the three tips below to hopefully take your golf game and golf scoring to a level never before seen.

Flip Your Strategy

A fresh approach to the golf course can open your eyes and present you with opportunities that you didn’t know were out there for you to score. If you are normally a conservative golfer, try hitting your driver more often and see if you can save a few shots by having shorter approaches. If you are usually aggressive, hit more irons off the tees and make sure you keep your ball in play more often than not. You don’t have to change your strategy for good – just a few rounds on your trouble holes playing the other way could be enough to shake you out of your funk and to bring your golf scoring to the next level.

Commit to Your Short Game

Next time you practice, leave your long clubs at home and just work on chipping and putting for the duration of your practice session. If you want to lower your scores, being skilled with the short clubs can help will lead you to your goals. Give them your undivided attention for a few practice sessions in a row and see what kind of returns that provides you on the course. You may likely be pleasantly surprised at how well your swing holds up even when you don’t practice it for a week or two, and your short game might be more comfortable and confident than ever before, bringing an improvement of your golf scoring.

Enter a Competition

This could just be a way to force yourself to get better. Play in a tournament or two, even if you aren’t as good as the competition and don’t stand a chance of winning. The experience in a tournament can quickly show you what areas of your game are holding you back, and which ones can hold up under pressure. Once the tournaments are over, look back and see where you needed to improve to score better. Where were the holes in your game? Then, it is just a matter of getting to work on those weak areas and improving them until they become a strength. All it may take is sharpening up a couple of your weak areas in order to reach the next step in your golf scoring potential.

If you liked the article about how to take your golf scoring to the next level and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Playing good golf under normal conditions can be a tough task, as you surely already know. Playing good golf under pressure? That can seem downright impossible, at times. One thing any golfer can do to test his or her skills is to play in a few tournaments and find out how their game holds up when there is some pressure involved. If you take this step, you can quickly find out what parts of your game are solid, and which need more work. In addition to being fun and exciting, golf tournaments can be a great way to take another step in your development as a player.

With that in mind, it makes sense to work on putting together a golf swing that is resistant to the pressure and unlikely to break down just because you get nervous. It is important to understand that no golf swing is ‘pressure proof’ – the nerves can get to everybody at one point or another. However, the more fundamentally sound and consistent your golf swing is, the better chance it has of being there when you need it most.

Limit the Role of Your Hands

When the pressure starts to get intense, your feel and touch may not be as sharp. That means chipping and putting can become much more difficult, and a golf swing that relies on timing and a lot of hand action through impact may cause some struggles. Players who have a golf swing that limits the role of their hands, and especially mitigates rotation through impact, are in much better position to hold up against the nerves.

When you are working on your golf swing on the driving range, try focusing  on making a swing that uses your big muscles to bring the club back and through. Some people can handle being more handsy, but minimizing hand action on approach shots and around the greens might be worth trying. Of course, your hands can still play a part in the action, but if you can do a lot of the work with your big muscles, you may be more resilient to pressure.

Focus on Balance

This point goes along with the previous one. Golf swings that are off-balance at some point can sometimes use a lot of hand action to ‘rescue’ them at impact. Try improving your balance so that you are swinging from a solid base on each and every shot. This can be good for your game overall, when you are playing under pressure and when you are just playing for fun. Practicing balance is a good way to help improve your golf swing, so make it a habit to include some basic balance drills in your regular practice routine.

Control Your Trajectory

It can be fun to launch the ball way up into the air – but shots like that when not necessary may be difficult to control under pressure. Instead, make a golf swing that hits controlled trajectory shots (lower to the ground) so you might have an easier time hitting your targets when you start to get nervous. There is a time and place for high shots, but that time is not always for when the pressure gets turned up. Work on hitting some lower shots on the practice range and you may start to feel a level of control that you don’t have over higher shots.

If you liked the article about how to build a golf swing that holds up under pressure and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Most people think of swing speed as being a purely physical endeavor. While it is physical, there is some room in there to add some miles per hour to your swing simply by thinking better. Golf is a game that is largely mental in nature, and bad thought processes have been known to undo more than a few golfers. You might be surprised at just how many areas of your game can improve when you commit to a consistent and rational thought process.

Following are five tips that could help you free up your swing and add a few yards to your drives – even without making a single physical change to the way you swing the club.

Tip #1 – Be Fearless

Fear can be a killer of swing speed, and more than that, a killer of good golf in general. It’s good to play with confidence when you are out on the course so you can live up to your full potential. If you are making swings while thinking about all of the trouble that lurks up by the green, you might get tense and lose some swing speed through impact. Stay relaxed, trust yourself and your preparation, and turn the club loose through the ball.

Tip #2 – Pick Shots You Can Hit

If you are trying to hit shots that you just aren’t comfortable with, it is natural to tighten up and lose speed in your swing. Make sure you are selecting targets that you are confident in your ability to hit, and that will give you some margin for error in case your swing speed isn’t perfect. By allowing for a little forgiveness in the target that you select, your mind may better be able to relax and your performance could improve.

Tip #3 – Don’t Try to Hit It So Hard

It might be counterintuitive, but trying to hit the ball hard is a mistake that can actually make you swing slower. Your body can tense up and opposing muscle groups work against each other– restricting freedom of movement and slowing down the motion of the club. Stay relaxed, and try thinking about just hitting the shot a comfortable, easy distance. If you’ve got a radar to play around with, try to keep your full swing at no more than 90-95% of your max. Your driver can perform better when you are thinking more about tempo and rhythm than sheer power and swing speed.

Tip #4 – Focus on the Job at Hand

Getting distracted and thinking about other things when you are trying to make a swing can be trouble. You can lose swing speed simply because you aren’t focused on the job of making a swing, and your sequencing and timing may suffer. It is the little technical details within the swing that accumulate to create a fast swing speed, so stay focused on the little things and the big picture can take care of itself.

Tip #5 – Ignore the Competition, Play Your Own Game

Some golfers get sucked into an ego-based competition of trying to outdrive their playing partner’s hole after hole. In the end, hitting it past your partner may not matter, as long as you still make a good score. Getting caught in this power struggle can also actually rob you of distance, however, as you try too hard to out-hit your friends.

If you liked the article about five mental game tips which will help you to improve your swing speed and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

It can be a great feeling to have ample swing speed at your disposal. Even a long golf course suddenly is far less intimidating when you can launch the ball down the fairway, or hit towering iron shots that come down soft. It isn’t necessarily enough, however, to have that power at your disposal – you need to know when and how to best use it. If you simply try to hit each shot around the golf course as hard and far as you can, good consistent results are probably unlikely. Rather, it can be good to demonstrate discipline and patience in order to get the most from your power.

Picking Your Spots

Depending on the type of golf course you are playing, there are likely to be some holes on the golf course that welcome the use of your power, and others that will punish you for missing just slightly. You job is to pick and choose the right times to be aggressive with your shots, and when to hit less club and make sure you stay in good position.

For example, a short par five might usually be a good time to try for a long drive so you can reach the green in two – but if there are hazards on both sides of the fairway, and deep bunkers around the green – you might be better served to play the hole in three shots and make sure you stay on the short grass. While it isn’t as fun to lay up on a par five, scoring-wise, you decision making should be first and foremost concerned with making the best score possible.

Not All Drives Must Be 100%

Just because you are hitting a driver doesn’t mean you have to give it maximum speed on every swing. Sometimes, a swing at about 90-95% effort is all that is required to hit a nice shot down the middle of the fairway and set up a comfortable approach. You won’t get any bonus points at the end of the round for hitting long drives on every hole, so don’t worry about smashing it off every tee. On the average, drives at 90-95% will probably be longer than the ones at 100% anyway. Instead, think of your round of golf like a chess match – for scoring it is all about position and putting yourself in the best spot to succeed on the golf course.

Trust Your Eye

Sometimes, a shot just doesn’t look right when you are getting ready to hit it. Even if you know you have the power to clear a hazard and reach the green, don’t fight your instincts if you are fully comfortable with taking on the shot. Good golf requires complete conviction, and you won’t be committed to a shot if you are doubting whether or not you should be trying it in the first place. Good decision making is part logical and part emotional – trust what your gut feeling is telling you and don’t go for a shot unless you are totally convinced that you can handle it.

By spending your practice time working on adding swing speed to your game, you are putting a valuable weapon in your arsenal on the golf course. However, just as important as being able to hit long drives, is knowing when to use them. Before each round, think about your strategy for the day and then adjust accordingly – even if that means you have to resist the temptation of the driver from time to time.

If you liked the article about knowing when to flex your muscle on the golf course and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

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