Category Archives: golf tips




By Paul Myers

Realistically, you only have so much time to dedicate to golf practice. Unless you are a professional golfer, you probably have plenty of other responsibilities that rank above golf practice – work, family, etc. However, you still have goals that you would like to accomplish in golf, and it will require some amount of practice to do so. Are you facing an impossible task? Not at all. The key is to properly allocate your practice time so you get the most return on the time spend on the driving range and putting green. As long as you have a plan for what you are going to work on, and how long you are going to work on it, improvement is absolutely attainable.

The 50/50 Rule

As a good place to start, try using the 50/50 rule when it comes to your golf practice sessions. That means that you will dedicate 50% of your practice time to your full swing, and 50% to your short game. So, if you head to the golf course with one hour available to practice, spend 30 minutes hitting balls and 30 minutes working on your bunker shots, chipping and putting. As long as you stick to this general guideline, you will at least be getting work in on all the various skills you need for the course.

Address Your Weaknesses

One mistake amateur golfers make when it comes to golf practice is spending too much time on things they are already good at, and ignoring the areas that give them trouble. For example, let’s say that you are already a good driver of the golf ball. You hit plenty of fairways, and have more distance than most of your playing partners. With that in mind, why would you spend much time practicing your driving on the range? Sure, you need to hit a few drives to stay sharp, but there are certainly areas of your game that could use more attention.

While it might be fun to show off on the range by blasting one drive after the next, it isn’t going to make you a better golfer in the long run. Use your rounds of golf to identify areas of the game that are giving you trouble, and then invest your practice time on fixing those problems. One idea behind practice is to improve on your weaknesses, so make sure you aren’t wasting too much time practicing things you are already good at.

Make Your Practice Reflect Actual Golf

How many times on the golf course do you get to stand in the same spot and hit the same putt ten or twenty times in a row? Never. So why do you do it on the practice green? If you are going to get better, it can be important to replicate on-course conditions as much as possible during your practice sessions. That means changing clubs frequently when you are hitting balls (drive, iron, pitch, drive, iron, drive, fairway wood, iron, pitch, etc) ), and moving all around the chipping area and the practice green when putting. This kind of practice can be more work, but it can help you become a better player.

If you liked the article and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

Finding your ball sitting down in a fairway bunker is not something most golfers looks forward to. Just getting your ball out of a fairway bunker and back onto the grass can be a challenge, let alone hitting a quality shot that ends up somewhere near the target. As your game improves and the mechanics of your swing become more consistent, you should get better at playing long shots from the sand.

Get the Right Idea

Sometimes, the thought from a fairway bunker is to just get the ball up as close to the green as possible to set up a pitch and a putt. If you actually get on the green and close to the flag, that is a bonus. One element to analyze when stepping into the bunker is the lip that you are going to have to get over. This will determine what club you can hit, and how far you can hit the shot overall. If there is a low lip in front of you, it might be possible to hit a long iron (given a good lie). However, if the bunker is deep and steep, your best option may be a wedge back onto the short grass.

There is no science to the evaluation of the height of the bunker lip – it is something that you will get better at through experience. Try to picture the trajectory of your ball as it leaves the club, and then decide which club will safely allow you to get out. It is important to remember that you always need to error on the side of caution. If you are unsure about a certain club, take one with a higher loft and play it safe. Even if you come up short of the target, you certainly don’t want to be playing your next shot from the same bunker.

Think Pick

In the fairway, the ideal strike with an iron is a slightly naturally descending blow down into the ball that either picks the ball from the grass (some great players don’t take much divots) or takes a divot of grass and launches the ball high into the air. That same technique can be used from the bunker. Take one more club than you would normally take…and try to ‘pick’ the ball off the top of the sand. The density of the sand can rob if you hit it just slightly fat, so you want to take the sand out of the equation as much as possible. When you practice these difficult shots, make an effort to sweep the ball cleanly off the top of the sand. This can be a challenge because it may be different than your normal swing, but it is a nice way to hit quality long shots from fairway bunkers.

If you liked the article and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

One of the things new golfers need to learn is just how important the lie of the golf ball is to the possibilities for a given shot. Where an average golfer might be able to carry their 5 iron 160 yards or more given a perfect lie in the fairway, they might have trouble even achieving 50 yards from the deep rough with the same swing. The lie determines a lot in golf, so analyzing your lie before each shot is a key thing to do.

Unfortunately, golf is not a game of perfect lies. In fact, you will probably have to play from a poor lie several times during a single round – if not more. Being able to play quality shots from bad lies is part of becoming a good golfer, and it is a skill that you can improve on over time. It is important to understand, however, that a ‘good’ shot from a bad lie might simply mean getting the ball back onto the fairway – not necessarily hitting it right next to the hole. It can help to accept the realities of the lie you are faced with, and then do your best to execute a smart shot.

To help you play some good shots from bad lies, try the following tips during your next round –

  • Play it safe. For scoring this is a must regarding hitting shots from bad lies. Simply, you don’t want to try to do too much and make your situation worse. One consideration prior to hitting the shot should be making sure that the next shot is played from a good lie somewhere on the short grass or some other easy spot, if possible. It might be tempting to try and pull off the ‘miracle’ shot that lands on the green, but that kind of risk can often hurt you in the end. You might go for the shot you can do 8 out of 10 times.
  • Loft is your friend. Hitting a shot from a bad lie with a lofted club will often be easier than hitting a long iron. This is especially true of shots played from the really deep rough. You might have to sacrifice some yardage by picking a club with more loft, but it will be far easier to get the ball up into the air and out of trouble. In the end, it may just go further with the higher lofted club than the really low lofted one.
  • Put the ball back in your stance. If the ball is sitting down in the rough, try moving the ball back in your stance more than usual to encourage a naturally downward strike through impact. You probably want to avoid getting the club stuck in the long grass and losing your club head speed, so changing your ball position can allow you to hit steeper in to the ball without getting as tangled in the grass. Keep in mind when hitting sharply down, the ball can pop out to the right (for a righty), so adjust your aim accordingly.

If you liked the article about the ball lie in golf and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

It’s not breaking news that the golf slice is one of the biggest problems plaguing most amateur golfers. If you are stuck dealing with a slice, you may be quite frustrated with the perceived inability to fix it, and it might even have you not wanting to play as much anymore. Don’t give up on your game just because you are dealing with a golf slice – instead, develop a specific plan to fix it so you can move on and get back to enjoying the game that you love.

1) Swing Out More to the Right (for a right-handed golfer)

Assuming you hit the ball in the center of the club face and you are catching the ball at the bottom of your swing arc, for a ball to start left of the target and slice back towards the target, your swing path had to be too far left. So in order to start the ball straight at the target, you need to swing out more to the right.

This can be a bit scary to do, especially if you do not want to hit to the right. It’s like skiing, if you lean back going down the hill, it’s much more difficult to ski well…than if you lean down the hill. So it’s sort of a matter of moving in the direction of your fear.

Since what you think is swinging straight is actually left, you may have to feel like your swinging well to the right in order for it to be straight.

2) Close the Clubface-to-Path Relationship

The other thing that is going on to cause the slice as mentioned above is that the club face could have to be open to your swing path. So the other piece of the puzzle is getting the face-to-path relationship from open to closed.

There are any number of ways to accomplish this. Sometimes strengthening (turning it clockwise) your lead hand grip slightly can help. You might also start the club at address a little more closed. Or you may feel like you close the club quicker on the down swing.

However that gets accomplished doesn’t matter so much, as long as it gets done.

Center Contact

Above we mentioned having center contact. The reason that is important is because another thing that could cause the slice is hitting the ball towards the inner part (the part closest to you) of the club face.

We won’t get in to center of gravity, gear affect, and the other related science behind that, but just know that hitting the inner part of the club face can cause slicing shots. If you want to check your contact, pick up some foot powder spray from your local pharmacy or drug store, spray some on the face, make 10 drives, and see where your striking pattern is located. If it’s on the inside part of the club, you’ll know that this could be causing part of your slice.

The golf slice is a swing fault that certainly can be fixed, even if it doesn’t feel like it at the moment. Start working on your slice by trying out the three tips above and seeing how much progress you can make. It is a challenge that may take some time and practice to overcome, but it can be done.

If you liked the article about fixing your golf slice and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Every golfer knows that it is important to practice their game if they want to improve and lower their scores. Unfortunately, many golfers give up on practicing because they don’t see the results of their efforts actually showing up on the course. It isn’t that their golf practice is pointless, it is just that they may not know how to practice properly to best get results from the time they put in. Once you understand how to practice a better way, you will be far more likely to see your scores drop – and that is the point at the end of the day.

Start by Nailing Short Putts

Nothing can ruin some people’s rounds faster than missed short putts, so you might start out your golf practice session with a round of four footers to get your confidence up. There are no tricks to this kind of golf practice – just set down several golf balls around four feet away from a practice putting hole, and try to make as many in a row as possible. To build pressure, set a goal for yourself that you have to reach before moving on. For example, you could decide that you need to make 10 straight before you head over to the driving range.

Alternating Clubs

Are you a golfer who hits your driver 10 or 12 times in a row on the driving range? If so, you may be wasting your time and possibly even hurting your game. When was the last time you hit a driver that many times in a row on the course? Never. Hopefully anyway! Playing golf is all about moving back and forth between your clubs and being able to swing each of them properly. So, if you have to play that way on the course, it only makes sense to spend some time practicing that way as well. As you work through a bucket of practice balls, try moving back and forth between long and short clubs to best replicate what you will be doing on the course. You may even pretend that you are playing the holes from the course on your driving range.

Don’t Forget Chipping

For some reason, chipping seems to be the forgotten part of the game of amateur golf. Despite being hugely important to the score that you post on the course, many golfers completely neglect chipping during their practice sessions. If you are serious about playing better, you should immediately focus some of your golf practice time on chipping. Vary the shots that you hit, and put your ball in a variety of difficult lies that you can practice from. Chipping is a skill that involves a level of feel and touch, so the more golf practice time you can put in, the better it may become.

Proper golf practice should not only be productive, but fun as well. Figure out which parts of your game are in need of the most work, and then focus on them during your practice sessions. Once you dial in a routine that works for you and addresses all of the areas of your game, you should quickly notice that you are performing better out on the course.

If you liked the for making your golf practice translate better onto the course and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

One common mistakes that amateur golfers make is assuming that they can treat their iron golf swing the same as their driver golf swing. The two swings are actually rather different, and understanding those differences will go a long way toward playing better golf. Of course there are elements of your golf swing that will apply to both swings, such as tempo and balance. However, it is really the differences that can make or break how successful you are on the course.

Ball in the Air

To start understanding why there are differences between the two swings, think about the conditions from which you hit your irons and driver most of the time. When you hit an iron shot, you usually hit it right off the turf, with no tee propping the ball up. The driver, by contrast, is almost always hit off the tee with some room below the ball. This leads to major differences in the technical aspects of the swings that you need to make. When hitting the ball off the ground with an iron, it’s best to catch the ball on the downswing to get it up into the air. This doesn’t mean trying to hit down per say, but just positioning the ball in a place where the natural swing arc catches it slightly on the down swing. Off the tee with a driver, while you could certainly do this with a driver, it’s better distance-wise to sweep the ball and catch it on the upswing to optimize the launch conditions. Some top professional long drivers catch the ball as much as 10 degrees on the upswing!

Design of the Club

Because they need to accommodate hitting a long shot off of a tee, drivers are built bigger heads than irons are to move the center of gravity around to make it easier to launch the ball up in the air. As the driver is also longer in length, you’ll need to swing the driver more around your body as opposed to up and down. Irons are designed partially to swing more vertically so you can hit down into the turf properly. If you were to try and swing your driver and your irons both in the same manner, you would be working against the design of each of the club and making the game harder than it should be. Take the lead that your clubs are giving you and make a more shallow golf swing with your driver, and a more vertical golf swing with your irons.

Balance Matters

While there are some differences between the swings you should make with your driver and with your irons, the balance you have during your golf swing should ideally be a constant. Balance is important regardless of what kind of shot you are hitting, how far you are trying to hit it, or what club you are using. By keeping good balance during all of your swings, you will likely have more consistency in your game that you can build on when you start to make the individual tweaks based on the clubs you are hitting.

If you are want to use only one swing throughout your whole game, try Sterling Irons same length irons: Custom fit to you individually by one of the top club fitters in the world.

Don’t hurt your golf game by trying to hit your driver in the same manner as you hit your irons. The clubs are designed differently, so you should probably  swing them slightly different if you want good results. Many players are more comfortable with one swing than the other, but you can become adept at both if you put in the time and practice each golf swing regularly.

If you liked the article about golf swings and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Are you a golfer that automatically reaches for the driver as soon as you get to the tee on a par four or par five? It’s okay to admit it – you are certainly among the majority. However, you might be better served to employ a two-golf-club approach to your game off the tee. When you have two options, your driver and one other club (even another driver designed for a different type of shot), you may be more able to make good decisions and get your ball in play in an ideal position as often as possible. Sure you may sacrifice some distance by using another golf club on some holes, but as long as you aren’t giving up too much distance you can be rewarded with better accuracy and fewer balls in trouble or lost for penalty shots.

Picking which golf club you are going to use as your other primary driving club should be pretty easy. The two most obvious options are either your three wood, or your favorite hybrid golf club. The three wood will provide the most distance of all of your other clubs aside from the driver, while you might have the better control over the hybrid. Think about your comfort level with either of these clubs and decide on the one that you like best.

If you want to do a second driver, you might build one for a fade and one for a draw, one for distance and one for accuracy, etc.

When do you pull the driver?

Of course, you may still want to hit your driver(s) as frequently as possible while making good decisions. You don’t have to shy away from hitting the driver all round long, but be smart about it at the same time. On a short par four with a narrow fairway, there really is nothing gained by hitting the driver, so why take the risk when there’s a great chance of getting in trouble? Use your other golf club and get the ball safely in play to set up a good approach shot.

A good rule of thumb for making golf club decisions off the tee is looking at what you will gain by hitting the driver, and work backward from there. The most obvious answer is distance, so on long holes, the driver will usually be the right choice. As long as you have enough room to hit the driver comfortably, and have a little margin for error with your target, swing away with confidence.

Not All Driver Swings are the Same

In addition to using another golf club off the tee from time to time based on the kind of hole that you are playing, you should also understand that not every driver swing has to be 100% max effort. In fact, you would benefit from taking some less-aggressive swings with your driver on holes where you don’t need your full distance to set up a good approach. Practice on the driving range taking swings at something less than full speed to get used to the idea of hitting an ‘easy’ driver down the fairway.

For that matter, possibly no golfer can swing at 100% and hit the ball consistently well. Maybe going 90-95% would be better. Some professional speed golfers can hit their drivers at many speeds. They don’t carry a full bag of clubs, so they need to be able to hit the driver at different distances. It’s a good skill to have.

Anyway, you don’t have to have a huge repertoire off the tee, but even just having one additional golf club (beyond your driver) that you are comfortable with or being able to hit the driver at various speeds could be a huge help. That way, when you step on each par four or par five tee, you can pick the best shot, pick a target, and hit a smart shot.

If you liked the article about using a two golf club combination for optimal driving performance and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

In many ways, the golf tee shot can be the most nerve-wracking shot that you will encounter on the golf course. Why is that? Because, since your tee shot is usually the longest shot you will hit on a hole, it also can with the most potential for trouble. If a hole is lined with trees, a water hazard or out of bounds stakes, you may find those trouble spots with your golf tee ball. Even if you don’t hit a ton of fairways during your round, simply avoiding big trouble off the golf tee will go a long way toward helping your final score.

There are a few steps you can take to limit the chances of getting in big trouble off the tee. Of course, you can never totally eliminate the chance of hitting into a bad spot, but use these tips to make sure it happens as little as possible.

Pick a Safe Target Line

Scoring-wise, you usually never want to pick a target line off the tee where a straight shot will likely get you in trouble. For example, picture a dogleg left par four where you plan to hit a right-to-left tee shot to match the shape of the fairway. There is nothing wrong with that plan, but make sure you are picking a starting line that will keep your ball safe if it happens to fly straight and never turns left. You don’t want to be punished for hitting the ball straight, so check the distances to any hazards before you hit and select a line that will be safe on a straight ball.

Give the Course Proper Respect

Usually, there are one or two holes on a given course that are particularly difficult and deserve your respect. Instead of trying to take these holes on aggressively, don’t be afraid to play conservative and just put the ball in play. Even if it means you have to hit 1-2 clubs more into the green for your second shot, using discretion instead of stubbornly trying a hard shot can benefit your scorecard in the end. Pick a safer club than your driver (or take some off your driver if you can do that) for the shot – one you are confident that you can hit into the fairway. There will likely be more chances to be aggressive later on holes that don’t present so many dangers.

Be Confident

Sometimes, a poor shot that sends the ball toward a hazard or out of bounds is born from fear of making that exact mistake. If you stand on the tee and focus at the place that you are trying to avoid, you may end up hitting it right there. Take your mind off of the bad things that could happen with a golf tee shot and instead focus on the positive outcome that you are looking for. Even the toughest hole has some kind of fairway for you to hit, so be confident in your ability and preparation and hit a quality shot where you want it to go…and not where you don’t want it to go.

If you liked the article about avoiding the big mistake off the tee and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Some golfers make the mistake of thinking that their driver swing is the same as their iron swing, and that the two can be practiced in the same way. This can be a costly error that could lead to problems in both swings. The driver swing and the iron swing are not the same if you are maximizing for distance off the tee, and they each need separate attention if they are going to improve successfully. This article is focused on the driver swing specifically, and what you can do to practice it properly.

Start with Your Rhythm

Good golf swings need good rhythm, but rhythm may never be more important than it is with the driver, simply because the driver is the club that sends the ball the farthest – and potentially the farthest off line. To keep control of your ball flight with the driver, maintaining good tempo all round long is crucial. To work on your rhythm, practice blowing a small amount of air out of your mouth or nose during a practice swing. It doesn’t have to be a lot, just enough for you to be aware of it. If when you swing, there is a big spike in the air flow, you are probably swinging with too much tension and could be out of rhythm. Try to swing and keep that air flow steady. Steady air flow = better rhythm.

Find Your Balance

Hanging back on the trail foot during a driver swing is a common mistake, and could lead to an ugly slice. To get your balance in order for your driver swing, try the following drill. Without using a golf ball, get ready to make a swing with your driver on the practice tee. As you move into the follow through, make sure your weight has moved enough toward your target so that your trail foot actually comes up off the ground slightly. If you are able to do this, it is a sure sign that your weight has moved effectively toward the target and not gotten stuck on your right side (for a right handed golfer).

The two drills above can be a nice way to work on the development of your driver swing- and neither one even requires that you hit a golf ball. Once you have put in some time on these drills, go ahead and go back to your regular swing and hit a few balls. If the drills have done their job correctly, you may notice a change in your ball flight and the way your swing feels with the driver. Then you might go back to these drills periodically to reinforce the ideas and make sure your driver swing stays on track.

If you liked the article about different ways to practice your driver swing effectively and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

When you think golf yips, you almost certainly think about the putter. And, true enough, the putting green is where most golfers experience the dreaded yips. However, the golf yips are also a battle off the tee for some golfers, and they can be even more destructive in this form. If you are afflicted with the yips on your driver swing it can seem like a challenge to even make contact with the ball – let alone to hit good tee shots on a consistent basis. It will take a little bit of work to get over this problem, but it can be conquered.

Getting Out of Your Own Way

Assuming you have had a time in the past where you were comfortable and confident off the tee, the key to this process is getting back to that point. To do that, you are going to need to get out of your own way and let the technique and ability that you possess do the work. To start, commit to taking a little time off from golfing on the course. This might be a sacrifice, depending on your usual golf schedule, but it could be worth it in the end. You may need some time away to get your mind sorted out and in a good place.

During the time off, think about what has worked before and spend time imagining yourself swinging like that in the present. Basically, instead of physical practice, you’ll be doing mental practice, swinging correctly and confidently in your mind 100% of the time for a week or more to help break the habit.

Head to the Range

When you are ready to return, head to the driving range to get started fixing your golf yips once and for all. Start by hitting a few shots with your other clubs, just to get warmed up. Once you feel warmed up, pull out your driver and five range balls. With each of these five balls, the only goal is to hit them as hard as you can. It doesn’t matter if they go straight – just try to smash them as far as possible.

Why? One problem with the golf yips is that the fear you feel for hitting a bad shot makes you tentative, and you start to swing slower and slower just trying to make good contact. It can be a downward cycle that is hard to stop. Swinging hard will free you up and allow your natural coordination do the job of hitting the ball.

Fixed?

After you have hit your five shots as hard as you can, hit five more with your regular swing. Hopefully, the first five shots will have freed you up nicely and, combined with your mental practice, you can hit some quality shots with a normal swing. At this point, you might feel like you are cured and ready to go back out onto the course – not so fast.

The golf yips aren’t something that are always cured with just one range session. Try to perform the drill above at least two or three times on separate days before you make the trip back out onto the course. Ideally you want to have the golf yips completely gone from your mind and be in a place of swinging confidently before you play so they don’t pop back up at the worst time. Dedicate yourself to a couple good weeks of mental and then range practice and only go back to the course when you feel sure that the golf yips are in your rearview mirror.

If you liked the article about beating the golf yips off the tee and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

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