Category Archives: Golf Swing Analysis




By Paul Myers

One common mistakes that amateur golfers make is assuming that they can treat their iron golf swing the same as their driver golf swing. The two swings are actually rather different, and understanding those differences will go a long way toward playing better golf. Of course there are elements of your golf swing that will apply to both swings, such as tempo and balance. However, it is really the differences that can make or break how successful you are on the course.

Ball in the Air

To start understanding why there are differences between the two swings, think about the conditions from which you hit your irons and driver most of the time. When you hit an iron shot, you usually hit it right off the turf, with no tee propping the ball up. The driver, by contrast, is almost always hit off the tee with some room below the ball. This leads to major differences in the technical aspects of the swings that you need to make. When hitting the ball off the ground with an iron, it’s best to catch the ball on the downswing to get it up into the air. This doesn’t mean trying to hit down per say, but just positioning the ball in a place where the natural swing arc catches it slightly on the down swing. Off the tee with a driver, while you could certainly do this with a driver, it’s better distance-wise to sweep the ball and catch it on the upswing to optimize the launch conditions. Some top professional long drivers catch the ball as much as 10 degrees on the upswing!

Design of the Club

Because they need to accommodate hitting a long shot off of a tee, drivers are built bigger heads than irons are to move the center of gravity around to make it easier to launch the ball up in the air. As the driver is also longer in length, you’ll need to swing the driver more around your body as opposed to up and down. Irons are designed partially to swing more vertically so you can hit down into the turf properly. If you were to try and swing your driver and your irons both in the same manner, you would be working against the design of each of the club and making the game harder than it should be. Take the lead that your clubs are giving you and make a more shallow golf swing with your driver, and a more vertical golf swing with your irons.

Balance Matters

While there are some differences between the swings you should make with your driver and with your irons, the balance you have during your golf swing should ideally be a constant. Balance is important regardless of what kind of shot you are hitting, how far you are trying to hit it, or what club you are using. By keeping good balance during all of your swings, you will likely have more consistency in your game that you can build on when you start to make the individual tweaks based on the clubs you are hitting.

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Don’t hurt your golf game by trying to hit your driver in the same manner as you hit your irons. The clubs are designed differently, so you should probably  swing them slightly different if you want good results. Many players are more comfortable with one swing than the other, but you can become adept at both if you put in the time and practice each golf swing regularly.

If you liked the article about golf swings and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

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By Paul Myers

Playing good golf under normal conditions can be a tough task, as you surely already know. Playing good golf under pressure? That can seem downright impossible, at times. One thing any golfer can do to test his or her skills is to play in a few tournaments and find out how their game holds up when there is some pressure involved. If you take this step, you can quickly find out what parts of your game are solid, and which need more work. In addition to being fun and exciting, golf tournaments can be a great way to take another step in your development as a player.

With that in mind, it makes sense to work on putting together a golf swing that is resistant to the pressure and unlikely to break down just because you get nervous. It is important to understand that no golf swing is ‘pressure proof’ – the nerves can get to everybody at one point or another. However, the more fundamentally sound and consistent your golf swing is, the better chance it has of being there when you need it most.

Limit the Role of Your Hands

When the pressure starts to get intense, your feel and touch may not be as sharp. That means chipping and putting can become much more difficult, and a golf swing that relies on timing and a lot of hand action through impact may cause some struggles. Players who have a golf swing that limits the role of their hands, and especially mitigates rotation through impact, are in much better position to hold up against the nerves.

When you are working on your golf swing on the driving range, try focusing  on making a swing that uses your big muscles to bring the club back and through. Some people can handle being more handsy, but minimizing hand action on approach shots and around the greens might be worth trying. Of course, your hands can still play a part in the action, but if you can do a lot of the work with your big muscles, you may be more resilient to pressure.

Focus on Balance

This point goes along with the previous one. Golf swings that are off-balance at some point can sometimes use a lot of hand action to ‘rescue’ them at impact. Try improving your balance so that you are swinging from a solid base on each and every shot. This can be good for your game overall, when you are playing under pressure and when you are just playing for fun. Practicing balance is a good way to help improve your golf swing, so make it a habit to include some basic balance drills in your regular practice routine.

Control Your Trajectory

It can be fun to launch the ball way up into the air – but shots like that when not necessary may be difficult to control under pressure. Instead, make a golf swing that hits controlled trajectory shots (lower to the ground) so you might have an easier time hitting your targets when you start to get nervous. There is a time and place for high shots, but that time is not always for when the pressure gets turned up. Work on hitting some lower shots on the practice range and you may start to feel a level of control that you don’t have over higher shots.

If you liked the article about how to build a golf swing that holds up under pressure and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Having all the right parts in your golf swing may not be enough – it can help to complete them in a good order as well. Sequencing can be a powerful element within a golf swing, and some of the players you watch on TV have learned this well. Even when you see professional golfers who have different technical elements within their swings, you will notice that the general sequence in which they do things is similar from player to player. Getting the sequencing in a good place can help maximize your potential as a golfer.

Putting together a nicely sequenced golf swing isn’t easy, but it can be difficult if you don’t understand a fine order of operations. The following steps will hopefully walk you through getting the club and body to work together, all leading up to a powerful impact with the ball.

Step #1 – Club First

The take-a-way doesn’t really matter all that much, but in general some say the golf club should be the first thing to move back away from the ball. Of course, in order to move the club, your body is going to have to move as well – but make it a subtle, quiet move. Ideally, they say to move the club back with a turn of your shoulders with a one-piece take-a-way, where your hands and arms won’t get involved until the club is well into the back swing motion.

Step #2 – Full Turn

Making a full turn in your backswing is an important part of maxing out golf swing speed. One goal during your backswing can be to create the greatest possible comfortable difference between the turn of your shoulders and the position of your hips – in other words, you would see your hips move very little, while getting a full turn back from your upper body. When that is accomplished, you can be in a good position to uncoil aggressively and ramp up your speed into the ball.

If you are unable to create the type of turn you would like in your golf swing, it’s okay to allow the hips to open more and rear leg straighten to get the upper body further back, but you can also work on your fitness and flexibility – by improving the physical capabilities that your body possesses, you can improve your swing.

Step #3 – Legs Start the Downswing

This is where some amateur golfers go wrong. Various average golfers will start the downswing with their hands and arms – this one small mistake can ruin the timing of the golf swing and can create all sorts of problems. Not only does this waste potential swing speed, it also can put the club off-plane and lead to a variety of poor ball flights. As soon as the club reaches the top of the back swing, it is the job of the legs and hips to start driving the golf swing. The torso, arms, and club then follow.

Step #4 – The Release through Impact

The club can be the last thing to come through the hitting zone. When you have properly sequenced your golf swing, you might feel your lower body rotating through the swing first, followed by your upper body, and lastly the club. This type of sequence creates a ‘whip-like’ effect that gives the club head the time and distance to accumulate speed. All that is left to do at this point is trust your technique and let the club rip through the hitting zone. If you have done it all correctly, a long and straight shot will hopefully be the result.

If you liked the article about why sequencing is a huge key to power in the golf swing and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

There can be a lot to be afraid of on the golf course in terms of hazards and other bad places for your golf ball to end up. If you start to look around the sides of each fairway, you are sure to see plenty of places that can cost you shots should your drive stray too far off line. Allowing those potential trouble spots to get in your head can have negative effects on your golf swing, so try to keep focused on the good stuff and keep your eyes away from the scary places.

One way to make the course appear much less intimidating is to ‘eliminate’ one side of the course by making technical adjustments to your golf swing. The idea is to create a golf swing and a ball flight that will only move the ball in one direction, so you can feel sure that you aren’t going to miss on a particular side. For example, you could work on your driver swing with the goal of taking the left side out of play. That way, any hazards on the left of the hole will not be of concern to you, and you can simply aim down the left side and let the ball move to the right.

Try Using Altered Grip

Instead of rebuilding your entire golf swing to try and eliminate one side of the golf course, consider a slight alternation to your grip instead. Using the example above, imagine that you are wanting to eliminate the left side of the course as a right handed golfer. It might be as simple as taking a weaker left hand grip to prevent yourself from releasing too aggressively through impact. Turn your left hand to the left and see what kind of ball flight results – you might find that you are then virtually unable to hit the ball into trouble on the left.

Do What Comes Naturally

When you are working on blocking out one side of the course with your golf swing, work with your natural tendencies or it will never be as comfortable as you would like. If you are a player who hits a fade naturally, don’t try to make a draw your ball flight that you try to go to hole after hole. It can be helpful to have complete ownership over your golf swing and feel totally confident even when the pressure is on – and you may not have those feelings if you are fighting against what comes natural to your golf swing. Of course, you can work on improving your golf swing, but it’s also good to be true to your instincts.

It can be a great feeling when you are able to eliminate one side of the course and only worry about the hazards on the other side. Playing the game this way can give you a new sense of confidence and more of an opportunity to craft a quality game plan that you can stick with all day long. It may take some work on the driving range to get comfortable with altering your golf swing to take out one side of the course, but that effort could be rewarded with some of your best-ever scores.

 

If you liked the article about golf swing and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Swing Man Golf Staff

In this video, Art Sellinger and Motion Golf analyze the Jamie Sadlowski swing, the RE/MAX World Long Drive Champion of 2008-2009.

If you liked the article about the Jamie Sadlowski swing and you think it would help another golfer, please

 

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