Category Archives: Golf Clubs




By Paul Myers

Proper equipment has a lot to do with success in golf. While golf clubs are never going to be able to hit the shots for you, it is important to have the right golf clubs that match your swing and are able to produce the ball flights that you are looking for. Some golfers try to find the clubs that they can hit the farthest, while others focus on accuracy first. Perhaps the best way to build a set of clubs is to pay attention to both of those characteristics and find clubs that offer you the best combination of the two.

Have Two Options Off the Tee

Picking out a driver can be the most exciting part of the equipment buying process, because it is the club that can offer the biggest thrill when it is pulled from the bag. However, you want to make sure that while you are figuring out how to maximize distance with your driver that you also have a club which is suited for hitting fairways as well. Outside of having something like a second driver (one for distance and one for accuracy), a popular, and successful, strategy is to pick out a three wood that is well-suited for use off the tee to act as a ‘second driver’. When you reach any par four or par five hole, you simply decide which is best suited for the layout of the hole and use it to hit your tee shot.

Short Irons are All About Control

A main concern to have for scoring when setting up your short irons is to make sure they are easy to control and offer good feel. It doesn’t matter as much how far you are able to hit your short clubs, as long as you can control them and generate the ball flights that you are looking for. Before you purchase any set of irons, find a golf shop that will allow you to try them out first so you can learn how they feel for yourself. Don’t rely simply on the opinions or reviews of others, as feel is something that will vary from player to player.

Blend Your Hybrid Clubs and Long Irons

Depending on your skill level and club head speed, you may wish to swap out some of your long irons in exchange for some hybrid clubs. This is a personal choice, and there is no right or wrong answer to how many of each you carry in the bag. Hybrid clubs can hit the ball higher and be great for long par threes and reaching par fives in two shots, but long irons are sometimes easier to control and can be great off the tee on short par fours. Experiment with both options and settle on the choice that you are most confident in when you stand over the ball.

Ideally, with any of the above mentioned situations, you’ll go through an entire fitting with a custom club fitter. It’s like wearing the right size shoe. Your performance will be much better wearing the right size as opposed to something that is a couple sizes to big or small.

If you liked the article about achieving distance and accuracy with golf clubs and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

For most golfers, getting a 9 iron shot mostly on-line with the target is not too challenging. You probably won’t have as much of a fade or draw with a short club like a 9 iron, so as long as you hit it correctly, the ball should head generally toward the target you have picked out. However, getting the distance right can be a whole different challenge. This is where some amateur golfers struggle, and can stand to improve. When you are able to control the distance of your short iron shots, you can quickly notice your scores start to come down.

How Far Should Your 9 Iron Fly?

You can estimate the distance that you should be able to get from your 9 iron by using the swing speed you achieve with your driver. If you are able to swing your driver at an even 100 MPH, a modern 9 iron shot should travel around 132 yards under normal conditions. While you might be able to hit the ball a little farther or shorter than that mark depending on the specific mechanics of your swing, you should find that you fall in that general range. Of course, the important thing isn’t achieving maximum distance with your 9 iron – rather, you want repeatable distance that you can rely on shot after shot.

Learn to Control Trajectory

In addition to managing your distance with a regular swing, you also may want to have some other shots available to you with the 9 iron. For example, when facing an approach shot where the hole is located in the far back of the green, it can be helpful to hit a lower shot that will bounce and roll before stopping. Likewise, when looking at an approach to a front hole location, a higher shot that stops quickly can be useful. Spend some time on the practice range working on both higher and lower trajectories with your 9 iron so you can call on those shots when the situation presents itself. Part of the challenge in this process is being able to hit the various shots and also know how far they are going to fly when you change the trajectory. That is something that can be learned with experience, so put in the practice time and you may be rewarded.

Hopefully, you feel good on the golf course when you get to pull a 9 iron out of the bag in the fairway and take aim at the flag – because this is place where birdies can be made. Most golfers will be able to hit a 9 iron when they are inside of 120 yards or so, meaning they should have a good chance to be aggressive and set up a short putt. Spend plenty of practice time with your 9 iron if you hope to see more short birdie putts during your next round.

If you liked the article and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

Are you a golfer that automatically reaches for the driver as soon as you get to the tee on a par four or par five? It’s okay to admit it – you are certainly among the majority. However, you might be better served to employ a two-golf-club approach to your game off the tee. When you have two options, your driver and one other club (even another driver designed for a different type of shot), you may be more able to make good decisions and get your ball in play in an ideal position as often as possible. Sure you may sacrifice some distance by using another golf club on some holes, but as long as you aren’t giving up too much distance you can be rewarded with better accuracy and fewer balls in trouble or lost for penalty shots.

Picking which golf club you are going to use as your other primary driving club should be pretty easy. The two most obvious options are either your three wood, or your favorite hybrid golf club. The three wood will provide the most distance of all of your other clubs aside from the driver, while you might have the better control over the hybrid. Think about your comfort level with either of these clubs and decide on the one that you like best.

If you want to do a second driver, you might build one for a fade and one for a draw, one for distance and one for accuracy, etc.

When do you pull the driver?

Of course, you may still want to hit your driver(s) as frequently as possible while making good decisions. You don’t have to shy away from hitting the driver all round long, but be smart about it at the same time. On a short par four with a narrow fairway, there really is nothing gained by hitting the driver, so why take the risk when there’s a great chance of getting in trouble? Use your other golf club and get the ball safely in play to set up a good approach shot.

A good rule of thumb for making golf club decisions off the tee is looking at what you will gain by hitting the driver, and work backward from there. The most obvious answer is distance, so on long holes, the driver will usually be the right choice. As long as you have enough room to hit the driver comfortably, and have a little margin for error with your target, swing away with confidence.

Not All Driver Swings are the Same

In addition to using another golf club off the tee from time to time based on the kind of hole that you are playing, you should also understand that not every driver swing has to be 100% max effort. In fact, you would benefit from taking some less-aggressive swings with your driver on holes where you don’t need your full distance to set up a good approach. Practice on the driving range taking swings at something less than full speed to get used to the idea of hitting an ‘easy’ driver down the fairway.

For that matter, possibly no golfer can swing at 100% and hit the ball consistently well. Maybe going 90-95% would be better. Some professional speed golfers can hit their drivers at many speeds. They don’t carry a full bag of clubs, so they need to be able to hit the driver at different distances. It’s a good skill to have.

Anyway, you don’t have to have a huge repertoire off the tee, but even just having one additional golf club (beyond your driver) that you are comfortable with or being able to hit the driver at various speeds could be a huge help. That way, when you step on each par four or par five tee, you can pick the best shot, pick a target, and hit a smart shot.

If you liked the article about using a two golf club combination for optimal driving performance and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Most likely, your golf driver is the most expensive club in your bag. With that, you want to get as much possible use out of the club as possible. Of course, you are already hitting it off the tee ten or more times per round, but are there other things you can use the driver for? While it might not be the most versatile club around, the golf driver doesn’t have to be relegated to just tee shot duty. If you get a little creative, and think outside the box, you can find other ways to use your driver to great effect on other shots.

Off the Deck

This is the most common place you see the golf driver used, other than off the tee. If you are trying to reach a par five hole in two shots, but your three wood won’t quite be enough to reach the green, consider trying to hit your driver right off the fairway. While this can be an effective strategy, it is also a little tricky to pull off correctly. Before you try it, go through the following checklist –

  • Do you have a good lie? You will probably need to have a good lie in the fairway or be propped up in the rough if you are going to execute the shot successfully.
  • Do you have room to run the ball up? Even though you could hit this shot a considerable distance, a lot of that distance will be on the ground when the ball is running up the fairway. Make sure the design of the hole allows for you to run it up at the green.
  • Have you practiced it? Like any other shot, it’s better to work on this play on the practice tee before you break it out on the course.

Put in a little time on the driving range to work on this specialty shot, and it could come in handy later on.

Bump and Run

There is no rule saying that your golf driver has to be used only on long shots. In fact, in certain situations around the green, it can be a good choice for a little bump and run shot. If you find your ball lying in light grass just a few feet off the edge of the green, with no deep grass between you and the target, consider using your driver for the shot. You can grip the club like you would your putter, and take it simply back and through like a putt to get the ball running toward the hole.

The advantage of using your golf driver in this scenario is that it is unlikely to get stuck in the grass like your wedge might. You should be able to just brush the club through the grass and pop the ball out with ease. Thanks to the size of the club head on your golf driver, it shouldn’t take much effort to get a considerable roll. Of course, you should practice this shot prior to using it during it a round.

These are just a couple of the potential uses you may find for your driver around the course. Keep your mind open and look for opportunities when the golf driver just might be the perfect tool for the task at hand.

If you liked the article of using your golf driver for other shots around the course and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Over the last few years, it seems that golf hybrids have completely taken over for long irons in the bags of most amateurs – and some professionals. It isn’t too hard to see why, as golf hybrids can be easier than irons to get up into the air, and thus tend to land softer than shots hit with the same iron. However, long irons are still a viable option for many players, take some time to think about your game and decide which option is best for you.

Below are three questions that can help you work through the process of making this decision. Of course, you don’t have to choose strictly one side or another, as you could have a hybrid club and some still keep some long irons in your bag, depending on the construction of the rest of your set.

Where do you play your golf?

The conditions that you usually play in have a lot to do with the types of clubs that you might choose to put in your bag. If most of your rounds are played on courses that are soft, long irons may not do as much good as they get some of the value from the roll out after the ball lands. Golf Hybrids might serve your better in soft conditions as they should stay in the air longer and maximize the carry you are able to achieve.

By contrast, if you play many of your rounds under windy conditions, long irons and the low ball flights they produce can be very valuable. It is sometimes difficult to flight your shots down when using golf hybrids, so they might not do you very much good in the wind. Consider keeping at least one or two long irons in the bag if you find yourself battling high shots in the wind on a regular basis.

How much swing speed to you possess?

Long irons are not usually as good of an option as a hybrid when you don’t possess a high swing speed through impact. For example, if you hit your driver in the range of 200-225 yards most of the time, you will probably be better off avoiding long irons. Golf hybrids will be probably easier for you to hit, and will give you the opportunity to hit higher shots with your long clubs to hold greens from long approaches. If you are able to hit your driver 250 yards or more (carry), then you certainly may have enough swing speed to at least experiment with some long irons as a part of your set.

What style of golf do you play?

Golf hybrids can be great for going for par five greens in two since they can hit the ball high, but that won’t do you much good if you rarely go for the green in two shots. Long irons are useful off the tee on short par fours because you can hit them low and let them run down the fairway, but a golfer who hits driver on every hole may not benefit from that ability. Think about the usual strategy you employ on the course, and then pick the best combination of golf hybrids and long irons that suit your style.

If you liked the article about golf hybrids and long irons and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Swing Man Golf Staff

Jaacob Bowden’s new GolfWRX article called “How Far Should You Hit Your Golf Clubs?” just came out.

Read it here. 

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If you liked the article “How for you should hit your golf clubs?” and you think it would help another golfer, please

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products, click here.