Category Archives: Golf Club Distance




By Paul Myers

Most of the shots you hit with your sand wedge will probably be something less than full shots – like hitting from the greenside bunker or playing a chip shot from the rough. However, there are times when you are going to want to hit a full shot with a sand wedge, such as when your ball is positioned perfectly in the fairway only a short distance from the green. In order to convert on these chances and turn them into short birdie putts, it is important that you understand how far you can hit your sand wedge with a normal swing.

Don’t Worry About the Total Distance

It doesn’t much matter how far you are able to hit the sand wedge – only that you know what you sand wedge distance is. Only hit it 70 yards? Perfect! Smash it over 110 yards? That works too. The distance simply needs to be repeatable time after time. Complicating the matter slightly is the fact that a club called a ‘sand wedge’ can vary in loft as much as 4 degrees or more. Therefore, spend some time working with your own clubs to make sure you know how far your personal wedge goes specifically. If you carry multiple wedges in your bag, make sure to have an accurate number for all of them too.

Valuable for Pitching the Ball As Well

A potentially tricky thing about using your sand wedge successfully to get the ball close to the hole is you often aren’t always going to be making a full swing. Sometimes, you will be closer to the green than your max yardage, and will need to make some kind of altered swing to handle the distance successfully. Many of these shots fall under the category of ‘pitch’ shots, and your sand wedge is often the best club for the job in this case. Using your sand wedge to conquer pitch shots can be a good idea because the loft of the club can help you get over any trouble between you and the hole (water, bunkers, etc.), while also putting spin on the ball that can help to stop it quickly when it lands.

The sand wedge isn’t designed to be a pure distance club, and it never will be. The idea when you are hitting a wedge is to get the ball as close to the hole as possible – not to hit it as far as possible. However, it is highly important that you are able to control the distance of your sand wedge swings throughout any round that you play. Figure out a specific yardage that you are comfortable hitting your sand wedge and then base the rest of your shots around that number.

If you liked the article and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

When you think about distance on the golf course, you probably naturally think about your driver first and foremost. After all, it is the club that goes the farthest, and can be the most fun to hit for many players. There is nothing wrong with trying to maximize distance with your driver, but knowing your distances with clubs like the pitching wedge might be even more important. Once you have reliable control of your pitching wedge distance, you can expect to face shorter birdie putts than you ever have before. You don’t need to swing extra hard or try to max out distance with your wedge like you might with the driver – instead, controlling your distance – and your ball flight – is far more important. It’s about minimizing your overall dispersion.

Distance is Directly Related to Swing Speed

Using your driver swing speed as a baseline, we can estimate how far you should be able to hit your pitching wedge under normal conditions. Let’s say that you are able to generate a 90 MPH swing speed with your driver – that would mean that you should be able to hit a pitching wedge around 109 yards. Swing faster? Expect more distance. Swing slower than 90 MPH with your driver? You will likely be shorter than the 109 yard mark. Either way, it is important that you understand your own swing and how far you can hit the ball on a consistent basis.

The Do-It-All Club

In addition to hitting standard approach shots into the green with your pitching wedge, you likely use it from a variety of other positions on the course. It could be one of your go-to chipping clubs around the green, and you can even use it from the bunker when you face a longer shot than your sand wedge is able to handle. Not only do you want to be reliable in hitting your pitching wedge the same distance with a full swing each time, but it can also help to be able to create other distances when you face a shot that falls in-between clubs. The closer you get to the green, the more important it becomes to have feel and touch in your swing – and the shots you need to hit with a pitching wedge are a great example of that.

If you are looking for more consistent pitching wedge distances, try Sterling Irons same length irons: Custom fit to you individually by one of the top club fitters in the world.

Don’t Hit It Too High

Many golfers make the mistake of thinking they need to launch their short irons way up into the air in order to get them to stop quickly. In fact, the backspin on the ball can provide  stopping power too, so there is no need to force the ball up into the air. The higher you hit a given shot, the harder it is for some people to control the distance – so the ideal plan is to find a good personal balance of shot height and spin. Practice getting control of these things and your will find that your distance control quickly improves.

If you liked the article and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 


HOW FAR SHOULD YOU HIT YOUR PITCHING WEDGE?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

As you move down the set from the 5 iron to the 6 iron, you start to get into what could be called ‘scoring clubs’. These are the clubs that you might be excited to hit into the green because you can potentially set up an opportunity for birdie. While you aren’t going to hit your 6 or 7 iron close to the hole all day long, you can expect to hit some quality shots that leave you with some makeable putts. Distance control once you get into the scoring clubs is especially important because you need to hit the ball exactly the right distance if you want to leave a short putt for your next shot.

What Can You Expect?

For a golfer who is able to generate a swing speed of 90 MPH with the driver, a 6 iron shot under normal conditions should travel around 147 yards. Your exact distance will depend on your ball flight and the quality of contact you make with the ball, so be sure to hit enough shots during practice with your 6 iron so you can become comfortable with knowing your own personal average distance. This number may change over time as you improve your swing, so pay attention to any adjustments that need to be made to your distance calculations.

Also a Layup Option

When you hit a good drive down the fairway of a par five, you are often met with a choice – go for the green in two shots, or layup and play to the green with your third? This is a decision that has to be made on a case-by-case basis, based on a number of factors and variables. However, when you do choose to layup, the 6 iron could be the right club for the job. Of course it depends on the situation, but sometimes if you use any more than a 6 iron, you may be leaving the ball too close to the hole – and setting up an awkward third shot. If you are good at short pitches that won’t matter as much…but play to your strengths. When you know how far you will hit your 6 iron, you can do some simple math and decide if it is the right club for your layup.

Start to Be Able to Spin the Ball

For many amateur golfers, it can be quite difficult to hit a 5 iron (or longer) with enough spin to stop the ball quickly. That can start to change when you get to the 6 iron and shorter. You might find that you are able to generate a good amount of spin on the ball when you hit a 6 iron, meaning you can be more aggressive when aiming at the target because the ball won’t roll out as far after landing. Once you master the art of getting your 6 iron to stop quickly, and you know how far you hit it, the number of birdie opportunities you enjoy should quickly increase.

If you liked the article and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

The 5 iron is one of the clubs that some new golfers spend a large amount of their time with because it is right in the middle of the set. It is a little bit easier to hit than some of the other long irons, but can hit the ball farther than the short clubs. For that reason, can be a great club to use when you are just learning the swing and trying to master your mechanics. However, even for experienced golfers, the 5 iron remains a vital part of any set and should never be completely overlooked during practice sessions.

5 Iron Distance is Key for the Rest of Your Clubs

Knowing how far you can hit your 5 iron is important information to have because you can use that number to then figure out most of the rest of your distances. For example, a golfer who is able to swing their driver with a 90 MPH swing speed should be able to hit a 5 iron approximately 156 yards. Knowing that, you can add or subtract about 8-10 yards for each club you move up or down in your set. The numbers you reach using this formula won’t be exact, but they can help you start to pick the right clubs before you accumulate more experience and start to dial in your distances more specifically (which you should do at some point!).

Often Useful on Par Threes

Among the many shots that a 5 iron can be useful for is the tee shot on par three holes. Many courses include par threes that are designed to land right around 5 iron distance for most golfers. Don’t be surprised if you find that during a given round, you have to hit your 5 iron on at least some of the par threes (on a regulation course). As par threes are commonly some of the most difficult holes on the entire course, it can be important to be comfortable with your 5 iron and be able to achieve your expected distance on a regular basis.

Stick with One Ball Flight

While advanced golfers may be able to move their 5 iron both right and left depending on the shot they are facing, many players will be best served sticking to just one ball flight for this club…a stock or go-to shot. You might choose whatever shot seems to come easiest to you with your 5 iron, and try to repeat that shape time after time. You might be able to hit a fade or draw on command with your shorter clubs, but doing so with a 5 iron can require a high level of skill and preparation.

One of the first things on your golf ‘to-do’ list can be getting comfortable with your 5 iron. Depending on the tees you choose to play, and the length of your local golf course, you may find that this club gets plenty of use during a normal round of golf.

If you liked the article and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

As more and more golfers use hybrid clubs instead of their 2 and 3 irons, many players have the 4 iron as their longest iron in the bag. If that sounds like your current setup, you will probably want to make sure you understand everything you can do with your 4 iron – including how far you can hit it. Knowing your 4 iron distance accurately can be important because it allows you to pick the right club at the right time and hit quality shots from long distances. The good news is that, for most golfers, the 4 iron is typically easier to hit than the 2 or 3 irons. With some practice and basic fundamentals, your 4 iron can be one of the most useful clubs in your bag.

4 Iron Distance Needs to Be Consistent

With any club in your golf bag, including the 4 iron, one important element is consistency from shot to shot. When you are able to dial in your distance within a few yards either direction, it can become much easier to pick which club to hit on which shot. If you are a player who averages right around 90 MPH swing speed with your driver, you can expect to hit your 4 iron right around 163 yards. Of course, your personal distance will vary slightly based on a number of factors. However, that 163 yard estimate for a player with a 90 MPH driver swing speed is a good place to start.

Learn the Knock Down Shot

When the wind comes up on the golf course, it can help to be prepared with some shots that you can hit to counteract the effects of the wind. Your 4 iron can be a great asset in this situation. Practicing a ‘knock down’ shot – a low shot that is meant to fly under the wind – is time well spent on the practice range. You will want to only make a portion of your normal swing in order to hit a good knock down shot. While this kind of shot will never reach the full distance of your regular swing, total distance isn’t the goal. You probably just want to be able to hit the ball straight and avoid having the wind affect the ball too much while it’s in the air.

A lot of golfers have fallen into the trap of believing that they aren’t good enough to hit long irons – but that isn’t always true. A 4 iron is a club that can be easy enough for most golfers to hit, and it can provide plenty of benefits in terms of flexibility and distance from the fairway. Spend some time working with your 4 iron on the practice tee and you might be pleasantly surprised by the results.

If you liked the article and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

While some golfers have chosen to take their 3 iron out of the bag in favor of another hybrid, this club is still alive and well in the bags of many golfers around the world. While hybrid clubs do have their benefits, there is something to be said for what a 3 iron has to offer. Between the wide variety of shots that you can hit using a 3 iron, and the distance that can be achieved when hit properly with enough speed, it is easy to see why many golfers are reluctant to part with this club.

Expected 3 Iron Distance

A golfer who is able to generate 90 miles per hour of swing speed with their driver can expect to hit their 3 iron in the range of 170 yards. As your swing speed goes up or down from that 90 MPH benchmark, you can expect your 3 iron distance to move up or down as well. It doesn’t matter too much how far you are able to hit your 3 iron, as long as you are able to strike it consistently and get the same distance shot after shot. Ideally, your 3 iron distance will fit nicely between your shortest fairway metal/hybrid club, and your 4 iron.

Useful Off the Tee

One potentially good reason to keep a 3 iron in the bag is the ability to use it off the tee on short par fours or long par threes. Hitting a 3 iron off the tee can be easier than hitting it directly off the turf, and it can be a valuable weapon to have available to you when hitting the fairway is a must. Most of us love to hit the driver as far as we can, but some holes are not designed to be friendly to the driver. When you encounter a narrow par four with hazards lurking to one side or the other, hitting a 3 iron down the middle might be your best option.

A Punch Out Club

Sometimes the best shot you will hit during a round of golf is the one that gets you out of trouble and back onto the fairway. If you have hit a drive into the woods and you need to get the ball back on the short grass, the 3 iron could be the perfect choice for the job. Because there is so little loft on a 3 iron, it can be easy to keep your ball flight below the branches of the trees as you work to get out of trouble.

Don’t be too quick to toss your 3 iron out of the bag in favor of a hybrid club. Experiment with your 3 iron to see what kind of shots you are capable of hitting, and how those shots could help you on the course. Once you learn your 3 iron distance, you could be able to use this long iron with confidence.

If you liked the article and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

If you are an experienced golfer, you likely already know how important the 8 iron is to making birdies. Because of the distance that it covers for most golfers, hitting an 8 iron into a green on a par four is a common occurrence. When you are able to hit your 8 iron a repeatable distance shot after shot, you can greatly increase your chances of hitting the green and making birdies. You don’t need to worry about hitting your 8 iron particularly far – as long as you know how far it is going to go, and what trajectory it is going to take along the way.

Know Your Base Distance

There will always be variables involved on the golf course when calculating how far you are going to hit your 8 iron – things like wind, elevation change, the lie of the ball, etc. – but it can help to have a baseline yardage that you expect under ‘normal’ conditions. From there, you can make adjustments to predict how far a given shot will fly. For a golfer who possesses a 100 MPH swing speed with a driver, a normal shot with an 8 iron should travel around 143 yards. If you can swing a driver at 120 MPH, you should look for more like 171 yards from your 8 iron, and a player with an 80 MPH swing speed will come in at around 114 yards.

Practice a Partial Swing Also

It can be helpful to know how far you can hit your 8 iron with a standard swing, but you are unlikely to run into that exact number too many times on the course. Instead, you will often find yourself in a situation where you need to take a few yards off of your full swing in order to get the ball close to the hole. Spend some of your time on the practice range hitting some partial shots so you get a feel for how far the ball will fly with something less than maximum effort. These are the kinds of shots that pro golfers use all the time, and they can quickly benefit your score once you get them figured out.

Don’t Overdo It

The one shot you should probably really never try to hit on the course is an 8 iron (or other short iron) that needs to fly farther than your normal swing can handle. Swinging extra hard at short iron shots is generally a bad idea, and can lead to poor results. When you are in-between clubs anywhere from 100 – 150 yards, the better option is probably to take the extra club and swing easier. This way, you can focus on your tempo and making good contact with the ball, knowing you have plenty of club in hand for the job.

If you liked the article and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

Is there a right distance to hit each of your clubs? Well, no – that is going to vary from golfer to golfer. However, it can be very important to knowing each golf club’s distance, as well as having an appropriate gap in between each so you don’t have any yardages on the course that you can’t handle with relative ease. Once you have nailed down how far all of your clubs go, and under what conditions, you can be able to make more confident decisions when you are pulling a club out of the bag.

Making Notes

One step in the journey to having accurate distances for your clubs can be simply writing down your carry distance for each shot. While it might seem like a pain at first, it will only take a few seconds and can be a big help after just a few rounds. In fact, if you can stick with the process of note taking for just a few rounds, you will already have enough information to get a clear picture of the distance to expect from each club.

If you want to take it a step further, you can enter all of your shots into a spreadsheet and create detailed averages for them. This isn’t necessary for the average amateur golfer, but is an option if you like to get deep into the details of improving your game.

Some Clubs are more about Control then Distance

When you are standing up on the tee with a driver in your hands, most of the time you want to hit is as far as possible while still being in play. Sure, you want to hit the fairway as well, but blasting it down there and impressing your friends along the way can be a lot of fun. Nothing wrong with that at all.

However, once you get up to that drive and you have a wedge in your hands, the whole conversation changes. It is all about getting the ball close to the hole, no matter what distance that means you hit a certain club. Many people are not impressed by how far you can hit a wedge, so stop trying to smash your short irons. Control is paramount with short clubs, and you should rarely if ever swing full out when holding a wedge. In fact, you might learn how far you hit your wedges at a maximum of 90% effort, and stick with that for your standard shot.

Building Your Distance Profile

Once you have taken the time to write down distances for all of your shots over the period of a few rounds, and learned how to swing in control with your wedges, you can put together a list of golf club distances for each club in the bag. Some golfers like to write this down and bring it with them on the course, others commit it easily to memory – do whatever you are comfortable with.

It is important to remember that you may have to adjust your distances as the weather changes, or you play different courses. For example, if the temperature goes up twenty degrees in the summer, might expect more carry distance. Likewise, when playing at higher altitude, the ball may stay up in the air longer. Be ready to adapt your numbers as you go, and remember that how far you hit your clubs is ever-changing based on a number of factors. Pay attention to your carry distances round after round so that you are never left unsure as to what club is right for the shot.

If you liked the article about knowing golf club distance and you think it would help another golfer, please

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products, click here.