Tag Archives: golf swing




By Paul Myers

One common mistakes that amateur golfers make is assuming that they can treat their iron golf swing the same as their driver golf swing. The two swings are actually rather different, and understanding those differences will go a long way toward playing better golf. Of course there are elements of your golf swing that will apply to both swings, such as tempo and balance. However, it is really the differences that can make or break how successful you are on the course.

Ball in the Air

To start understanding why there are differences between the two swings, think about the conditions from which you hit your irons and driver most of the time. When you hit an iron shot, you usually hit it right off the turf, with no tee propping the ball up. The driver, by contrast, is almost always hit off the tee with some room below the ball. This leads to major differences in the technical aspects of the swings that you need to make. When hitting the ball off the ground with an iron, it’s best to catch the ball on the downswing to get it up into the air. This doesn’t mean trying to hit down per say, but just positioning the ball in a place where the natural swing arc catches it slightly on the down swing. Off the tee with a driver, while you could certainly do this with a driver, it’s better distance-wise to sweep the ball and catch it on the upswing to optimize the launch conditions. Some top professional long drivers catch the ball as much as 10 degrees on the upswing!

Design of the Club

Because they need to accommodate hitting a long shot off of a tee, drivers are built bigger heads than irons are to move the center of gravity around to make it easier to launch the ball up in the air. As the driver is also longer in length, you’ll need to swing the driver more around your body as opposed to up and down. Irons are designed partially to swing more vertically so you can hit down into the turf properly. If you were to try and swing your driver and your irons both in the same manner, you would be working against the design of each of the club and making the game harder than it should be. Take the lead that your clubs are giving you and make a more shallow golf swing with your driver, and a more vertical golf swing with your irons.

Balance Matters

While there are some differences between the swings you should make with your driver and with your irons, the balance you have during your golf swing should ideally be a constant. Balance is important regardless of what kind of shot you are hitting, how far you are trying to hit it, or what club you are using. By keeping good balance during all of your swings, you will likely have more consistency in your game that you can build on when you start to make the individual tweaks based on the clubs you are hitting.

If you are want to use only one swing throughout your whole game, try Sterling Irons same length irons: Custom fit to you individually by one of the top club fitters in the world.

Don’t hurt your golf game by trying to hit your driver in the same manner as you hit your irons. The clubs are designed differently, so you should probably  swing them slightly different if you want good results. Many players are more comfortable with one swing than the other, but you can become adept at both if you put in the time and practice each golf swing regularly.

If you liked the article about golf swings and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

In a hurry to hit the ball as far as they can, some golfers rush through their driver swing. While it might feel like you are swinging harder by putting in more effort, that can actually slow the swing down and also rob you of accuracy. Most of the time, you will have more success building speed in your driver swing if take your time and use a sub-maximum tempo (maybe 90-95% or less) that keeps all of your moving parts in proper sequence to lead the club into impact just perfectly. If you have been swinging your driver “quick” up to this point, the change might take some time – but you may be very impressed with the results.

It Starts in the Takeaway

A slower not-overdoing-it driver swing starts by moving the club away a bit slower from the ball. In fact, this can be a key moment in the driver swing that sets up your tempo. When you pull the club back quickly through the first foot or so of the swing, you may be set on a path for an overly quick swing and may not be much you can do to change it at that point. A subtly slower takeaway can do you plenty of favors, including helping you stay on balance and also softly engaging your core muscles to be used through the rest of the driver swing. A fast takeaway can create a tendency to lift you up and out of your posture, making it difficult to hit a solid shot in the end. Work on a slightly slower takeaway (not sure slow, just slow enough to stay in control) and you may quickly see how much it can benefit your game.

Time at the Top

The only point in the driver swing where the club needs to be moving fast is through impact – other than that, you are free to take your time and let it build naturally. Nowhere is this more true than during the transition from backswing to downswing. This is a relatively common ‘rush’ spot in the driver swing where many amateurs see things go awry. Take your time during the transition part of your swing to make sure that you are on balance and that your lower body is leading the move down toward impact. You probably don’t want your arms and hands to lead the way – in fact, you may want them to be the last thing that comes through the zone. Feel like there is a short subtle pause at the top of your driver swing for everything to gather, and then start down with your lower body pulling the club into position.

Golf can be a paradox in a lot of ways, and hitting long drives is one of those things that may seem a little backwards. You feel like you should swing as fast and hard as possible to generate speed, but overdoing it can be counterproductive. If you can make a smooth, easy driver swing that only gets fast  right through impact, you will likely be more consistent with your power. It might take some time to get the proper feeling for how to generate easy power, but it is an amazing ability to possess once you get comfortable and put in the practice time.

If you liked the article about the driver swing and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Your feet might be the last place you think to look for more power in your golf swing, but there is more importance to your footwork in the golf swing that you might believe. In fact, golfers who have good footwork are already well ahead of the game and stand a much better chance of hitting consistent, powerful, solid golf shots all day long. Footwork certainly isn’t the most glamourous element of the game to practice, but it can have a profound impact on your golf swing.

So what does good footwork look like? Well, it actually doesn’t look like much at all. Good footwork is pretty boring, and you probably won’t even notice it when you see it. However, it is often easy to spot bad footwork. When a golfer is moving their feet all around during a golf swing and coming out of balance – a poor shot is sometimes the result. Some feel that footwork is ‘quiet’, meaning that the feet stay on the ground for the most part (with some styles allowing the lead heel to come up in the back swing…and rear heal up at impact) and provide the rest of your body the support it needs to make an aggressive golf swing.

Watch the Front Foot

You might have seen some golfers who let their lead foot come up onto its toe during the backswing (left foot for a right handed golfer). This isn’t a terrible thing to do, and there are definitely some successful professional golfers, long drivers, and Hall of Fame golfers with this element in their golf swing. However, provided you have the flexibility to make a long enough back swing, you may wish to keep that lead foot flat on the ground. Any movement you can eliminate from the swing can possibly make you more consistent with your ball striking, and consistency in golf is always a good thing. If you have the required flexibility and can still swing rhythmically with your lead foot flat on the ground throughout the golf swing, that may be the way to go.

Stay Down Through Impact

Another trouble spot for some golfers with their footwork is right as the club starts to come down into the ball. Many players tend to stand up onto their toes as the club comes down, possibly to try and squeeze out a little more power from the golf swing. In reality, this move probably makes it harder to create solid contact, and is unlikely to help you swing faster anyway. If you have this habit in your swing, it might take some time to break – but it is worth the time and effort to make the change. Try to remain flatfooted at impact with the lead foot. Allowing your back foot to be up at impact is okay though.

Footwork might not be the most-important element in the golf swing speed equation, but it does matter. Just like any other technical element in your swing, ironing out mistakes in your footwork can make the golf swing more-simple and easier to repeat all throughout the round. Spend some practice time working on ‘quiet feet’ and feel how your golf swing adjusts and adapts as a result. A change in footwork may lead to a change in how you swing, so expect your ball flight to possibly change as you work on making this improvement.

If you liked the article about how to find more golf swing speed in your footwork and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Playing good golf under normal conditions can be a tough task, as you surely already know. Playing good golf under pressure? That can seem downright impossible, at times. One thing any golfer can do to test his or her skills is to play in a few tournaments and find out how their game holds up when there is some pressure involved. If you take this step, you can quickly find out what parts of your game are solid, and which need more work. In addition to being fun and exciting, golf tournaments can be a great way to take another step in your development as a player.

With that in mind, it makes sense to work on putting together a golf swing that is resistant to the pressure and unlikely to break down just because you get nervous. It is important to understand that no golf swing is ‘pressure proof’ – the nerves can get to everybody at one point or another. However, the more fundamentally sound and consistent your golf swing is, the better chance it has of being there when you need it most.

Limit the Role of Your Hands

When the pressure starts to get intense, your feel and touch may not be as sharp. That means chipping and putting can become much more difficult, and a golf swing that relies on timing and a lot of hand action through impact may cause some struggles. Players who have a golf swing that limits the role of their hands, and especially mitigates rotation through impact, are in much better position to hold up against the nerves.

When you are working on your golf swing on the driving range, try focusing  on making a swing that uses your big muscles to bring the club back and through. Some people can handle being more handsy, but minimizing hand action on approach shots and around the greens might be worth trying. Of course, your hands can still play a part in the action, but if you can do a lot of the work with your big muscles, you may be more resilient to pressure.

Focus on Balance

This point goes along with the previous one. Golf swings that are off-balance at some point can sometimes use a lot of hand action to ‘rescue’ them at impact. Try improving your balance so that you are swinging from a solid base on each and every shot. This can be good for your game overall, when you are playing under pressure and when you are just playing for fun. Practicing balance is a good way to help improve your golf swing, so make it a habit to include some basic balance drills in your regular practice routine.

Control Your Trajectory

It can be fun to launch the ball way up into the air – but shots like that when not necessary may be difficult to control under pressure. Instead, make a golf swing that hits controlled trajectory shots (lower to the ground) so you might have an easier time hitting your targets when you start to get nervous. There is a time and place for high shots, but that time is not always for when the pressure gets turned up. Work on hitting some lower shots on the practice range and you may start to feel a level of control that you don’t have over higher shots.

If you liked the article about how to build a golf swing that holds up under pressure and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Having all the right parts in your golf swing may not be enough – it can help to complete them in a good order as well. Sequencing can be a powerful element within a golf swing, and some of the players you watch on TV have learned this well. Even when you see professional golfers who have different technical elements within their swings, you will notice that the general sequence in which they do things is similar from player to player. Getting the sequencing in a good place can help maximize your potential as a golfer.

Putting together a nicely sequenced golf swing isn’t easy, but it can be difficult if you don’t understand a fine order of operations. The following steps will hopefully walk you through getting the club and body to work together, all leading up to a powerful impact with the ball.

Step #1 – Club First

The take-a-way doesn’t really matter all that much, but in general some say the golf club should be the first thing to move back away from the ball. Of course, in order to move the club, your body is going to have to move as well – but make it a subtle, quiet move. Ideally, they say to move the club back with a turn of your shoulders with a one-piece take-a-way, where your hands and arms won’t get involved until the club is well into the back swing motion.

Step #2 – Full Turn

Making a full turn in your backswing is an important part of maxing out golf swing speed. One goal during your backswing can be to create the greatest possible comfortable difference between the turn of your shoulders and the position of your hips – in other words, you would see your hips move very little, while getting a full turn back from your upper body. When that is accomplished, you can be in a good position to uncoil aggressively and ramp up your speed into the ball.

If you are unable to create the type of turn you would like in your golf swing, it’s okay to allow the hips to open more and rear leg straighten to get the upper body further back, but you can also work on your fitness and flexibility – by improving the physical capabilities that your body possesses, you can improve your swing.

Step #3 – Legs Start the Downswing

This is where some amateur golfers go wrong. Various average golfers will start the downswing with their hands and arms – this one small mistake can ruin the timing of the golf swing and can create all sorts of problems. Not only does this waste potential swing speed, it also can put the club off-plane and lead to a variety of poor ball flights. As soon as the club reaches the top of the back swing, it is the job of the legs and hips to start driving the golf swing. The torso, arms, and club then follow.

Step #4 – The Release through Impact

The club can be the last thing to come through the hitting zone. When you have properly sequenced your golf swing, you might feel your lower body rotating through the swing first, followed by your upper body, and lastly the club. This type of sequence creates a ‘whip-like’ effect that gives the club head the time and distance to accumulate speed. All that is left to do at this point is trust your technique and let the club rip through the hitting zone. If you have done it all correctly, a long and straight shot will hopefully be the result.

If you liked the article about why sequencing is a huge key to power in the golf swing and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

A frustrating thing a golfer can go through is the sudden loss of distance – with no apparent explanation. You might feel the same as you always have, you think you are swinging the same way, and yet the proof is right there in front of you in the fairway. You are no longer hitting the ball as you did just a few years – or months – ago. What happened?

While this can be a frustrating experience, keep it in perspective and look at the problem from a logical standpoint. Where could your distance have gone? What could have changed that led to the loss of golf swing speed, and in turn, the loss of distance off your driver? It isn’t necessarily an easy puzzle to solve, but you can figure it out with a little time and effort.

Following are three possible explanations for your missing golf swing speed, and what you might be able to do to get it back.

Reduced Time on the Course

If you don’t play as much golf as you used to, that very well could be the reason for the loss of power. Even if you are doing a good job of keeping your body in strong physical condition, there are many little muscles in the body that are used specifically in golf and may not be as fit as they once were. When you play a lot, those muscles get a certain kind of workout that they won’t get any other way – and you simply may need time on the course to keep them going strong.

When you suspect that lack of time on the course is to blame for your loss of golf swing speed, the answer can be simple – play more! Even if you can’t get onto the course that frequently, just visiting the driving range and hitting balls on a regular basis can do wonders for restoring the power in your swing.

Loss of Confidence

Golf swing speed and overall confidence in your game are more-closely related than you might think. When you feel good about where you game is at, and where the ball is going to go, you typically feel more free to turn it loose. Some golfers who are down on their confidence can start ‘hanging on’ during the swing and trying to steer the ball down the fairway. As a result, the release through impact is inhibited, and golf swing speed is lost. Even if you aren’t playing your best, try to keep your confidence high (fake it ’til you make it!) and trust in the practice you have done. Simply by clearing your mind and freeing up your muscles to make an aggressive swing, you might see the golf swing speed numbers quickly return to their previous levels.

Father Time

This can be a tough one, and a topic that some people would rather not talk about. At some point, for everyone, Father Time starts to catch up and we simply aren’t capable of the same athletic feats that we once were. As you age, your muscles don’t always have the same explosive abilities. If all other explanations fail, you might just be losing some golf swing speed as a result of the aging process.

The good news, however, is that you can still play great golf even if you have lost a few miles per hour off your swing. As long as you continue to work on your technique, and your short game, you can still aim for shooting great scores regardless of how far you now drive the ball.

Some of the effects of the aging process can also be reversed or slowed down through swing speed training. There is a Swing Man Golf member who in his mid-50s hit multiple 300-yard drives at a sea level course through swing speed training. He had never had more than a couple 300-yard drives in his entire life up to this point. To get started on swing speed training, click here.

If you liked the article about tracing the origins of lost golf swing speed and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

There can be a lot to be afraid of on the golf course in terms of hazards and other bad places for your golf ball to end up. If you start to look around the sides of each fairway, you are sure to see plenty of places that can cost you shots should your drive stray too far off line. Allowing those potential trouble spots to get in your head can have negative effects on your golf swing, so try to keep focused on the good stuff and keep your eyes away from the scary places.

One way to make the course appear much less intimidating is to ‘eliminate’ one side of the course by making technical adjustments to your golf swing. The idea is to create a golf swing and a ball flight that will only move the ball in one direction, so you can feel sure that you aren’t going to miss on a particular side. For example, you could work on your driver swing with the goal of taking the left side out of play. That way, any hazards on the left of the hole will not be of concern to you, and you can simply aim down the left side and let the ball move to the right.

Try Using Altered Grip

Instead of rebuilding your entire golf swing to try and eliminate one side of the golf course, consider a slight alternation to your grip instead. Using the example above, imagine that you are wanting to eliminate the left side of the course as a right handed golfer. It might be as simple as taking a weaker left hand grip to prevent yourself from releasing too aggressively through impact. Turn your left hand to the left and see what kind of ball flight results – you might find that you are then virtually unable to hit the ball into trouble on the left.

Do What Comes Naturally

When you are working on blocking out one side of the course with your golf swing, work with your natural tendencies or it will never be as comfortable as you would like. If you are a player who hits a fade naturally, don’t try to make a draw your ball flight that you try to go to hole after hole. It can be helpful to have complete ownership over your golf swing and feel totally confident even when the pressure is on – and you may not have those feelings if you are fighting against what comes natural to your golf swing. Of course, you can work on improving your golf swing, but it’s also good to be true to your instincts.

It can be a great feeling when you are able to eliminate one side of the course and only worry about the hazards on the other side. Playing the game this way can give you a new sense of confidence and more of an opportunity to craft a quality game plan that you can stick with all day long. It may take some work on the driving range to get comfortable with altering your golf swing to take out one side of the course, but that effort could be rewarded with some of your best-ever scores.

 

If you liked the article about golf swing and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

There is plenty of time for technical thinking regarding your golf swing. In fact, if you are going to get significantly better at the game, you will probably need to spend some time working on technical aspects and improving the efficiency of your golf swing motion. One mistake some golfers make, however, is not drawing a line between the time for thinking technically, and the time for just playing golf.

When you stand on the first tee and get ready to start a round, technical thoughts should probably be nowhere near your mind. Instead, try to focus only on executing your shots, hitting your targets, and making good decisions. Getting the ball in the hole as soon as possible can be hard enough – and it’s not necessary to make it harder by distracting yourself with technical golf swing thoughts. All of that work should probably have been done on the range during your dedicated practice time. When you head out to play a round is when the fruits of your labor are supposed to show themselves.

Below are a couple of tips to help you leave your technical thinking behind and get in a good frame of mind for playing your best golf. Just as with anything else on the golf course, improving your thinking may take time and practice. Start working on better mental game habits in your very next round, and the results might surprise you.

No Technical Practice before a Round

This is mistake that many amateur golfers make before a round. Your warm-up time on the driving range should probably be just that – a warm-up. It is not necessarily a practice session, and should likely not be treated as such. You aren’t trying to improve your golf swing technique while you warm-up on the range, you are only trying to find some rhythm and get your muscles ready to do the job of swinging the club.

There is an old saying among some professional golfers that applies in this case – ‘If you didn’t bring it with you, you aren’t going to find it here’. Basically, that means that you realistically probably aren’t going to be able to improve your golf swing on the range before a round. Whatever swing you came with when you arrived at the course is the one you should probably try to use during the round. To help keep technical golf swing thoughts out of your mind during the round, don’t let them enter your head on the driving range. Get yourself warmed up, and leave it at that.

Be Committed to the Process

An idle mind can be a dangerous thing, so golfers who don’t have much going on mentally before a shot sometimes tend to turn their attention to technical elements that may only cause problems. Instead, immerse yourself in the process of choosing a target and picking the right shot for the situation. If you are extremely focused on the game plan that you are going to use for each shot, you it leaves less time to get distracted by thoughts about your golf swing technique. Better golfers tend to be those who can better focus on the job at hand shot after shot, all day long.

If you liked the article about technical thinking for your golf swing on the driving range and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

Golf swings are quite different from player to player – even among the best players in the world. If you watch some golf on TV, it won’t take long to see that there is great variety among the golf swings of the touring professionals. Even with those differences, they are all able to produce consistently quality shots and shoot good scores on most days. There is a lesson to be learned from the variety of swings you see on the tour – that there is certainly more than one way to get the job done.

However, there are a few traits that all of the good players share. As an amateur golfer, you would be smart to try and copy the five traits below as you are working on improving both the power and consistency in your own golf swing.

#1 – Balance

If there is a golden rule when it comes to swinging the golf club, balance is it. With good balance, you should find it relatively easy to make solid contact with the ball and hit repeatable shots time after time. Balance also enables you to use all of your power and maximize the golf swing speed potential that you have inside. Without balance, a consistent golf swing is almost impossible to find, and you will probably be frustrated with the results more often than not.

#2 – Comfortable Grip

There are a variety of ways in which you can grip the club to make a golf swing, and many of them can work beautifully. However, you want to make sure that your grip is comfortable for you and that you make the same grip swing after swing. If you are ‘fighting’ your grip and feel like the club is placed awkwardly in your hands, it will be very difficult to pull together a golf swing that feels natural and repeatable.

#3 – Good Foot Work

Foot work isn’t something that most golfers think about, but it is very important in the search for a repeatable golf swing. Many amateur golfers make the mistake of having their feet moving too much during the swing, which again leads to inconsistency. Quiet feet do the job of supporting your aggressive golf swing without getting in the way or pushing you off balance. Make sure your feet stay connected to the ground as much as possible during the golf swing, and that you use them to drive through the ball and generate speed through impact.

#4 – Clear Target

Not all golf swing traits are physical in nature. Having a clear target is more of a mental game item, but it is vital to making sure your golf swing lives up to its potential. When you stand over a shot and don’t have a specific target in mind that you are trying to hit, your golf swing can suffer as a result. The first step of any shot should be to pick a clear and decisive target – from there, you can work on executing the physical elements of your golf swing to deliver the ball to the target.

#5 – Confidence

You won’t find a professional golfer who makes their swings without complete confidence in what they are doing. In fact, if you do find a pro golfer lacking confidence in their golf swing, you can be sure they won’t be a pro for much longer. Golf requires supreme confidence in order to find success, so work on trusting your own swing as much as possible. When you are practicing on the range is the time to critique your golf swing and make change – on the course, you need to believe in it completely.

If you liked the article about the five key traits to every good golf swing and you think it would help another golfer, please LIKE it below!

 

Looking for a way to not only significantly improve your golf swing, but also add 30 – 40 yards to your drives? You might consider giving our Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training a try.
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HOW FAR SHOULD YOU BE DRIVING IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT SOON?

With Swing Man Golf’s Swing Speed Training, based on your gender, age, handicap and average driving distance, how far could you be driving it? Use this tool to find out:

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By Paul Myers

With some pro golfers, their power is something of a surprise. There are plenty of smaller players who are unable to uncork long drives, and it can be amazing to see them generate such force from a small frame. With Dustin Johnson, however, there is nothing surprising about his power at all. Just to look at Dustin Johnson, you can see that he is an impressive athlete, and you probably aren’t caught off guard at all when he launches a huge drive down the middle of the fairway. If there is such a thing as easy power in golf, Johnson has plenty of it.

When talking about the Dustin Johnson swing, it is important to note that he isn’t all power and no skill. In fact, he is a very talented all-around player with 10 professional wins to his credit. He has come extremely close to major championship titles on a couple of occasions, and it seems inevitable to many people that he will take home one or more before his career is over.

However, this article is about his power. The swing speed and driving distance numbers that Johnson has posted during his career are nothing short of amazing, and are possible a part of why he is one of the most popular players on the PGA Tour.

Consistently Near the Top

When looking at the swing speed statistics from the PGA Tour, you don’t have to scroll far to find Dustin Johnson’s name among the leaders. So far in the 2014 season, Johnson is averaging 121.93 MPH over 26 measured drivers. His fastest recorded speed is 123.94 MPH, with the slowest measured speed still registering at 119.44.

Looking back, Johnson has made a habit of being toward the top of this list. Since the 2008 season, his first on Tour, Johnson has been in the top 10 every season – usually within the top three. It isn’t a surprise, then, to learn that Johnson also finds himself near the top of the driving distance statistic on a regular basis as well. So far in 2014, Johnson is ranked second on tour in average driving distance, only behind Bubba Watson. Johnson’s average? A ridiculous 310.3 yards.

How Does He Do It?

Watching Dustin Johnson swing the golf club, many people are immediately struck by how wide his golf swing is. Johnson stands 6’4’’, and he uses all of that frame to create a wide swing that rapidly gains speed as it comes down into the hitting area. Also, he swings the driver confidently, with no noticeable ‘hang on’ through impact. He is committed to smashing his drives, and he does just that.

He also plays with a rather strong left-hand grip, which can aid him to create even more speed at the bottom of the swing. While the power that he generates is impressive, perhaps even more impressive is the control he is able to have over the ball at such high speeds. It takes more than raw power to have the kind of success Johnson has had on the Tour so far, and that is a tribute to his overall skill on the golf course from tee to green.

Where He Goes From Here

It’s hard to imagine anything but success in the future for Dustin Johnson in his golf career. Only 29 years old, Johnson already has a great number of accomplishments under his belt and still should have many great seasons ahead of him. Not many in the golf world will be surprised if Johnson is able to capture his first major title within the next year or two. While he has a great overall game, his amazing power is sure to be a big part of any future titles that he is to secure.

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