Tag Archives: golf swing speed




By Paul Myers

Over the last two decades or so, distance on the PGA Tour has increased dramatically. This has mostly to do with the improved technology in the golf clubs and balls, but it is also may be related to the better physical condition of the players themselves. Physical conditioning was not a priority for golfers a generation ago, but that has changed significantly. Most players today take pride in their fitness and use it as another tool that they can use in the fight for lower scores.

So, the question is, will swing speed increase in the coming years, or have we reached a level where it is going to remain pretty well static for the near future? With some limits having been put in place on the technology that is used in golf club construction, longer drives are going to have to be found mostly by greater club head speeds.

Better Athletes Could Be Coming

There is a lot of money to be made in professional golf – that is no secret. Of course, that money is very, very difficult for most to make, but it is there for the taking for a select few who reach the top of the game. Along with money comes interest, and with interest often comes better athletes. Young people who might have previously put their attention into other, more lucrative sports, may now be focusing on golf as their preferred game. When that happens, we could find that swing speed increase simply because of the great athletes that would suddenly be playing on tours around the world.

With that said, there are already plenty of great athletes playing golf – people like Tiger Woods, Dustin Johnson, Adam Scott, and more. While there is some room for great athletes to make their mark on the swing speed leaderboard, it doesn’t seem like that is happening yet. The average PGA TOUR swing speed hasn’t really changed much since 2007, despite there now being knowledge out there of how to do it .

The Point of No Return

It is important to remember that the focus of professional golf isn’t to hit long drives – it is to shoot low scores. Long drives can help in the quest to shoot lower scores (in fact, there is a correlation between higher swing speeds and lower scores), but they are far from the only ingredient. It’s also important to be able to round together the rest of the game well enough to make it on a tour.

In all, it seems based on the past seven years that swing speed will remain around where it is currently for the foreseeable future. That is, unless tour players on a greater scale undertake swing speed training like what is available at Swing Man Golf.  Such a shift in the training of tour players sure would be interesting to see, especially since we know that the average RE/MAX World Long Drive Championship finalist can average almost 30 mph (at least 75 yards farther off the tee) in the mid 140s. For Tour players and amateurs alike, there’s a lot left in their swing speed developmental tanks.

If you liked the article about whether the swing speed will increase in the coming years and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Your feet might be the last place you think to look for more power in your golf swing, but there is more importance to your footwork in the golf swing that you might believe. In fact, golfers who have good footwork are already well ahead of the game and stand a much better chance of hitting consistent, powerful, solid golf shots all day long. Footwork certainly isn’t the most glamourous element of the game to practice, but it can have a profound impact on your golf swing.

So what does good footwork look like? Well, it actually doesn’t look like much at all. Good footwork is pretty boring, and you probably won’t even notice it when you see it. However, it is often easy to spot bad footwork. When a golfer is moving their feet all around during a golf swing and coming out of balance – a poor shot is sometimes the result. Some feel that footwork is ‘quiet’, meaning that the feet stay on the ground for the most part (with some styles allowing the lead heel to come up in the back swing…and rear heal up at impact) and provide the rest of your body the support it needs to make an aggressive golf swing.

Watch the Front Foot

You might have seen some golfers who let their lead foot come up onto its toe during the backswing (left foot for a right handed golfer). This isn’t a terrible thing to do, and there are definitely some successful professional golfers, long drivers, and Hall of Fame golfers with this element in their golf swing. However, provided you have the flexibility to make a long enough back swing, you may wish to keep that lead foot flat on the ground. Any movement you can eliminate from the swing can possibly make you more consistent with your ball striking, and consistency in golf is always a good thing. If you have the required flexibility and can still swing rhythmically with your lead foot flat on the ground throughout the golf swing, that may be the way to go.

Stay Down Through Impact

Another trouble spot for some golfers with their footwork is right as the club starts to come down into the ball. Many players tend to stand up onto their toes as the club comes down, possibly to try and squeeze out a little more power from the golf swing. In reality, this move probably makes it harder to create solid contact, and is unlikely to help you swing faster anyway. If you have this habit in your swing, it might take some time to break – but it is worth the time and effort to make the change. Try to remain flatfooted at impact with the lead foot. Allowing your back foot to be up at impact is okay though.

Footwork might not be the most-important element in the golf swing speed equation, but it does matter. Just like any other technical element in your swing, ironing out mistakes in your footwork can make the golf swing more-simple and easier to repeat all throughout the round. Spend some practice time working on ‘quiet feet’ and feel how your golf swing adjusts and adapts as a result. A change in footwork may lead to a change in how you swing, so expect your ball flight to possibly change as you work on making this improvement.

If you liked the article about how to find more golf swing speed in your footwork and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Most people think of swing speed as being a purely physical endeavor. While it is physical, there is some room in there to add some miles per hour to your swing simply by thinking better. Golf is a game that is largely mental in nature, and bad thought processes have been known to undo more than a few golfers. You might be surprised at just how many areas of your game can improve when you commit to a consistent and rational thought process.

Following are five tips that could help you free up your swing and add a few yards to your drives – even without making a single physical change to the way you swing the club.

Tip #1 – Be Fearless

Fear can be a killer of swing speed, and more than that, a killer of good golf in general. It’s good to play with confidence when you are out on the course so you can live up to your full potential. If you are making swings while thinking about all of the trouble that lurks up by the green, you might get tense and lose some swing speed through impact. Stay relaxed, trust yourself and your preparation, and turn the club loose through the ball.

Tip #2 – Pick Shots You Can Hit

If you are trying to hit shots that you just aren’t comfortable with, it is natural to tighten up and lose speed in your swing. Make sure you are selecting targets that you are confident in your ability to hit, and that will give you some margin for error in case your swing speed isn’t perfect. By allowing for a little forgiveness in the target that you select, your mind may better be able to relax and your performance could improve.

Tip #3 – Don’t Try to Hit It So Hard

It might be counterintuitive, but trying to hit the ball hard is a mistake that can actually make you swing slower. Your body can tense up and opposing muscle groups work against each other– restricting freedom of movement and slowing down the motion of the club. Stay relaxed, and try thinking about just hitting the shot a comfortable, easy distance. If you’ve got a radar to play around with, try to keep your full swing at no more than 90-95% of your max. Your driver can perform better when you are thinking more about tempo and rhythm than sheer power and swing speed.

Tip #4 – Focus on the Job at Hand

Getting distracted and thinking about other things when you are trying to make a swing can be trouble. You can lose swing speed simply because you aren’t focused on the job of making a swing, and your sequencing and timing may suffer. It is the little technical details within the swing that accumulate to create a fast swing speed, so stay focused on the little things and the big picture can take care of itself.

Tip #5 – Ignore the Competition, Play Your Own Game

Some golfers get sucked into an ego-based competition of trying to outdrive their playing partner’s hole after hole. In the end, hitting it past your partner may not matter, as long as you still make a good score. Getting caught in this power struggle can also actually rob you of distance, however, as you try too hard to out-hit your friends.

If you liked the article about five mental game tips which will help you to improve your swing speed and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Golf isn’t a sport that requires the same type of physical conditioning as, for example, football or basketball, but it can be a demanding game none the less. Making quality swings with enough swing speed time after time requires cooperation from a variety of muscle groups. The better conditioned your body is in as a whole, the easier it will be for you to make good swings with enough swing speed to hit the kind of shots you are looking for.

If you are committed to improving your game by adding swing speed and reaching levels you have not previously achieved, dedicating yourself to a better body is a great idea. Obviously, the benefits of fitness go well beyond the added swing speed and the fairways of the golf course, but using golf as motivation could be just what you need to get in better shape. When you do decide to hit the gym in an effort to make gains with your golf game, focusing on the muscle groups below should serve you well.

If you aren’t sure how to target these muscle groups in the gym in a golf swing specific way, there are explanations of what kinds of things you can do in the member area of Swing Man Golf…in addition to exercises for other key muscle groups.

Lower Back

The lower back area is one that gives trouble to many golfers, so adding strength and improving this area of your body through things like rack pulls could help you to stay on the course for many more years to come with capabilities of decent swing speed. Back problems are common amongst some golfers, and if you play the game long enough you may have at least minor trouble with this area at some point. While exercise won’t guarantee that you stay healthy in the lower back, it should help reduce your risk and possibly speed up recovery.

Quads, Hamstrings, Glutes, etc

The muscles in your legs help you to keep a solid base during the swing, and also are responsible for generating some power through impact, adding swing speed. Any weakness in either your quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, etc could show itself in the swing, and can make it difficult for you to hold your posture from start to finish with a decent amount of speed. Things like half squats, half leg curls, and half leg extensions are great for developing the golf swing.

Hands and Forearms

The muscles in your hands are forearms have a lot to say about how well you are able to control the club face through impact. Especially when playing from the rough, it is important to have the strength in your hands to keep the face square to your target and not let it get twisted up in the grass. Also, hand and forearm strength comes in handy when playing from bunkers where you need to create swing speed with a short swing and splash the ball up and out of the sand.

The returns in your golf game from improved fitness might not be seen immediately, but they should start to show over the long run. In addition to feeling good about being in better shape, you can also look forward to increased possibilities on the golf course (added swing speed etc.), knowing that your fitness will no longer be holding you back.

If you liked the article about most Important muscle groups for adding swing speed and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

A frustrating thing a golfer can go through is the sudden loss of distance – with no apparent explanation. You might feel the same as you always have, you think you are swinging the same way, and yet the proof is right there in front of you in the fairway. You are no longer hitting the ball as you did just a few years – or months – ago. What happened?

While this can be a frustrating experience, keep it in perspective and look at the problem from a logical standpoint. Where could your distance have gone? What could have changed that led to the loss of golf swing speed, and in turn, the loss of distance off your driver? It isn’t necessarily an easy puzzle to solve, but you can figure it out with a little time and effort.

Following are three possible explanations for your missing golf swing speed, and what you might be able to do to get it back.

Reduced Time on the Course

If you don’t play as much golf as you used to, that very well could be the reason for the loss of power. Even if you are doing a good job of keeping your body in strong physical condition, there are many little muscles in the body that are used specifically in golf and may not be as fit as they once were. When you play a lot, those muscles get a certain kind of workout that they won’t get any other way – and you simply may need time on the course to keep them going strong.

When you suspect that lack of time on the course is to blame for your loss of golf swing speed, the answer can be simple – play more! Even if you can’t get onto the course that frequently, just visiting the driving range and hitting balls on a regular basis can do wonders for restoring the power in your swing.

Loss of Confidence

Golf swing speed and overall confidence in your game are more-closely related than you might think. When you feel good about where you game is at, and where the ball is going to go, you typically feel more free to turn it loose. Some golfers who are down on their confidence can start ‘hanging on’ during the swing and trying to steer the ball down the fairway. As a result, the release through impact is inhibited, and golf swing speed is lost. Even if you aren’t playing your best, try to keep your confidence high (fake it ’til you make it!) and trust in the practice you have done. Simply by clearing your mind and freeing up your muscles to make an aggressive swing, you might see the golf swing speed numbers quickly return to their previous levels.

Father Time

This can be a tough one, and a topic that some people would rather not talk about. At some point, for everyone, Father Time starts to catch up and we simply aren’t capable of the same athletic feats that we once were. As you age, your muscles don’t always have the same explosive abilities. If all other explanations fail, you might just be losing some golf swing speed as a result of the aging process.

The good news, however, is that you can still play great golf even if you have lost a few miles per hour off your swing. As long as you continue to work on your technique, and your short game, you can still aim for shooting great scores regardless of how far you now drive the ball.

Some of the effects of the aging process can also be reversed or slowed down through swing speed training. There is a Swing Man Golf member who in his mid-50s hit multiple 300-yard drives at a sea level course through swing speed training. He had never had more than a couple 300-yard drives in his entire life up to this point. To get started on swing speed training, click here.

If you liked the article about tracing the origins of lost golf swing speed and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

It can be a great feeling to go in for a swing analysis or club fitting and light up the machine with impressive swing speed numbers. You can brag to your buddies about your lightning-quick swing, and look forward to hitting those long drives down the middle of the fairway on the impressive golf distance. There may only one problem – you aren’t seeing those long drives fly down the middle of the fairway on the golf distance that is needed. Instead, your drives are landing well short of your playing partners, even though you have them beat in terms of swing speed.

Just because you can impress the radar gun, doesn’t mean you are automatically going to hit long drives. There are more variables in play than just speed, so some tuning to the rest of your swing may be needed if you want to convert your potential into actual power.

Center of the Club Face

If there is one element that is great to execute time and time again when hitting your driver, it is matching the middle of the club face to the back of the ball…hitting it on the sweet spot. The maximum power will be transferred from your club to the ball when you hit the sweet spot, so that is exactly what you probably want to do. If you make contact out by the toe, or in off the heel, you are going to lose much of that power you worked so hard to create. Not only that, but the shot is more likely to be off line as well. A good swing and solid balance can be key in order to make reliable contact shot after shot.

Lose the Side Spin

The more golf distance a ball travels sideways in the air, the less golf distance it travels down the fairway. In order to get the most golf distance from your drives, you need to take as much sidespin off of the ball as possible. In fact, in the Swing Man Golf member area there are some ideal spin numbers to achieve based on your club head speed and whether you want to optimize for carry or total distance.

Coming into impact with a clubface square to your swing path will help you limit sidespin and can help give you the best possible energy transfer. If you can only pick one or the other, a swing that is on path with a square club face is more or less preferred over a faster swing with a poor position at impact that hits the ball all over the planet.

Get the Right Equipment

Another common way to lose golf distance off your drives even with a fast swing speed is playing a driver that is not well-matched to your game. For maximum distance, it’s important to optimize your equipment by going through a club fitting process with a trained professional. Getting the right club (including head and shaft) that will play to your strength and creating good launch conditions is vital to maximizing yards on your drives. Club fitting sessions are worth the price, and some golf shops will refund your fee if you wind up buying a driver from them after the fitting is complete. Going through this extra step to fine-tune your driver might be a little more work than just ordering a club online, but you will likely be rewarded in the end.

If you liked the article about how to translate your swing speed into actual golf distance and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

As golfers, many of us are endlessly seeking more and more swing speed so we can add distance to our drives. More distance means shorter approach shots, and shorter approach shots usually means more birdies. If you want to be a better golfer, adding swing speed is normally a great way to get there.

But is it possible to have too much of a good thing? Can you do damage to you game in the pursuit of more swing speed, even if you reach your speed goals? This isn’t a topic that all golfers will agree on, but it is something to think carefully about. If you are a golfer who is working hard to add swing speed, make sure that you are doing so with the best interests of your golf game in mind.

Following are three ways in which adding swing speed could potentially hurt your game in the long run. This doesn’t mean you should stop trying to get more speed into your swing – it is only meant as a word of caution so you don’t get out of control and wind up hurting your game as a whole.

#1 – Getting Off Balance

It isn’t worth trying to record higher swing speeds if you are pulled off balance in the process. A consistently repeatable swing is one that has good balance from start to finish, so don’t let yourself lose balance just to add a few more miles per hour. A fast swing speed isn’t any good if you don’t make solid contact in the center of the club face time after time, so make balance a priority even if it means you leave a couple extra miles per hour in the bag.

#2 – Losing Control of Your Ball Flight

Even if you are able to max out your swing speed while maintaining your balance, it’s still good to have control over your ball flight on a regular basis. Predictable ball flights can help with good scores, and players with ultra-high swing speeds sometimes have trouble producing ball flights that can be relied on over and over. That isn’t to say that you can’t control the ball while swinging very hard – certainly many professional golfers do so on a regular basis. However, if your level of skill isn’t such that you can manage your ball flight along with serious power, consider backing off just slightly until you find a sweet spot that allows you to control your ball and still have plenty of power at your disposal.

#3 – Maintaining it All Day Long

Much like a starting pitcher in baseball, it can be nice to be able to make quality swings all day long – not just for a few holes. If you are swinging so hard that you are getting tired during the round, or your muscles are starting to wear out, you might think about backing off. While it is fun to blast the ball for a few holes, it may not do you much good if you have run out of steam late in the round. Make sure you are swinging hard enough to generate power, but also swinging at a pace that you are able to hold up for a full 18-hole round.

If you liked the article about swing speed and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

In this article we’ll tell you about tour players with surprising swing speed.

Some of the longest hitters on the PGA Tour are easy to spot. Guys like Bubba Watson and Dustin Johnson have enormous power, and just one look at them swinging a driver will make that quite obvious. There is nothing subtle about their power and great swing speed – it is evident right from the start.

However, some of the players on the PGA TOUR that pack an impressive punch don’t necessarily give you that impression right away. These guys can be ‘sneaky’ with their power and their swing speeds, but they are launching the ball out there nonetheless. Often, guys that appear on this list have smooth swings that accumulate power through beautiful technique as opposed to raw strength and aggression.

Following is a list of five players who you might not think of as particularly long hitters, but are certainly worthy of a second look in that regard. All swing speeds listed are gathered from official PGA TOUR statistics for the 2014 season.

Sergio Garcia – 120.03 MPH

Garcia is a big name on the world stage in the game of golf, but isn’t necessarily thought of as a big hitter in part because of his slight stature. Despite being smaller than many of the players on Tour, Garcia can positively blast the ball off the tee. Sergio likely creates more lag in his swing than any other player in the game, and he uses it to generate impressive club head speed through impact.

Aaron Baddeley – 117.61

‘Badds’ is probably more recognized for his putting prowess than his swing speed, but he is currently ranked T32 on the PGA Tour in this category. Baddeley has a swing that seems to repeat consistently throughout a tournament, and he has somewhat quietly built an impressive career all over the world. With ample power off the tee and a great putting touch, it isn’t hard to see why he has had so much success.

Andres Romero – 115.15

Romero could fall into the same category as Garcia, being a smaller-than-average guy who gets everything he can out of his frame. Romero hasn’t necessarily broke through for a big win just yet, but he has shown plenty of talent in putting his name high on the leaderboard in the 2007 Open Championship.

Charl Schwartzel – 118.20

This Masters champion has what many consider to be a wonderful looking swing, which he is able to translate into plenty of power off the tee. In winning at Augusta, he didn’t necessarily appear to overpower the course in the same manner as an Angel Cabrera or Bubba Watson, but clearly he had plenty of swing speed at his disposal to get the job done.

Louis Oosthuizen – 115.54

Another major champion, Oosthuizen took home the 2010 Open Championship and possesses an impressive swing speed despite standing just 5’10’’. In addition to having a Claret Jug to his name, Oosthuizen also was involved in a playoff at the 2012 Masters, where he lost to Bubba Watson on the second playoff hole.

If you liked the article about tour players with surprising swing speed and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and how fast you should be driving it right now, and b.) how far you COULD be driving and how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female



By Paul Myers

Many gains in your golf game come slowly, over time. Most need to put in many hours of practice time to see significant improvements, and it can take years to drop several strokes off of your handicap. One of the things golfers enjoy about the game is constantly striving to improve and shoot lower scores – and that is a pursuit that can literally last a lifetime.

Of course, we as golfers aren’t always patient enough to wait for those improvements to come along. If you would like to see some quick developments in your game, you can try the three methods below to increase your swing speed. While adding some miles per hour to your swing speed won’t necessarily make you shoot lower scores, it can help you get a little closer to reaching your scoring goals. Also, who doesn’t love hitting a tee shot further down the fairway?

#1 – Relax Your Grip Pressure

Tight grip pressure can be an instant killer of swing speed, so try working on relaxing how much you squeeze the club during the swing. It may take some practice to get comfortable swinging with less tension in your hands, so this is something you definitely need to work on during a practice session before taking out onto the course. Start with small, short swings with a wedge to get the feel of using a lighter grip pressure before moving on to hitting your long clubs. Essentially, you want to hold on to the club as tight as needed to maintain control, and no tighter. Starting with short shots can help you to find this balance.

#2 – Widen Your Stance

Swing speed can’t be maximized if you are off balance during your backswing or downswing, so consider making your stance another inch or two wider to stabilize your base. You might feel like your legs are engaged at address and ready to support the turning of your upper body. Be careful, however, because a stance that is too wide can actually hinder movement and hurt swing speed. Try placing your feet about shoulder width apart (with a driver) and see how that feels. You can make minor adjustments from there until you are comfortable and feel that your stance is keeping you on balance and supporting an aggressive swing through the ball.

#3 – Adjust Back Foot Position

When you take your stance, try turning your back foot (right foot for RH golfer) out and away from the target. Instead of having your toes pointed straight ahead of you, they will be turned open a few degrees to the right (again, for a RH golfer). This stance will help make it a little easier to turn back away from the ball, and could add some length to your backswing. As long as you are able to stay on balance and make quality contact with the ball, the added length in your backswing will hopefully translate into more speed at the bottom of the swing. If you find that this position is comfortable for you during the driving swing, try putting it to use with all of your clubs.

If you liked the article about the three ways to increase swing speed and you think it would help another golfer, please

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and to get more swing speed from swing speed training, click here.




By Paul Myers

When you want to find more distance off the tee, a great place to look is through increased swing speed. Sure, you can optimize your equipment to add a few yards on your drives, but if you are going to see serious increases in how far you can launch the ball down the fairway, you need to add MPH’s to your swing speed.

But what is a good swing speed? What kind of number should you be reaching for, and what goals are a little too lofty? It is unlikely that you will reach Bubba Watson-like levels with your swing speed, but that doesn’t mean you can’t increase your power and add yards to your drive. By setting a goal and then taking action to reach that goal, longer drives might be closer than you think.

Where are you at currently?

One way to set a swing speed goal for yourself is to go get your swing analyzed and find out where you are currently. After all, it is pretty much impossible to set a realistic swing speed goal if you don’t know where you are starting from. Call up your local courses or golf shops and ask about getting a swing analysis completed. Not only will the measurements you receive give you information about your swing, but they can also help you to purchase the right equipment when the time comes for some new gear.

It is possible to estimate your swing speed based on your average driving distance, but it is better to have it measured so you can know for sure. For example, if you hit most of your drives right around 200 yards or so, you probably have a swing speed in the neighborhood of 80 MPH. However, you might be a little bit higher or lower than that number, which can make a big difference when setting your goals. Take the time to find out for sure, and go from there.

Set Moderate Goals

It is always tempting when setting a goal to shoot for the moon and be as ambitious as possible. While this is a noble aim, it might just lead to frustration and disappointment in the end. To continue with the previous example, imagine that you have an 80 MPH swing speed currently. Rather trying to get it all the way up to 100 MPH right away, try shooting for 90 MPH over the course of a month. That should be a very attainable goal that you can reach with a combination of swing speed, equipment, and technical improvements.

If you are able to improve your swing speed by just five miles per hour, you will start to see the increased distance show up on the course. Once that goal is out of the way successfully, you can readjust and set a higher number as your new target. Incremental goals like these will help you stay focused and make it easier to feel accomplished after putting in a period of work on your swing.

Believe it or not, some Swing Man Golf members have put on 20, 30, and even 40 MPH of additional swing speed over the course of months of hard work and dedication.

Swing speed is certainly not the only element that determines the ability of a golfer, but it is an important one and there is a direct correlation between swing speed and handicap. Possessing power on the course opens up a lot of opportunities, so taking the time to set some swing speed goals – and then working to achieve them – should benefit your game greatly in the long run.

If you liked the article about swing speed goals for amateurs golfers and you think it would help another golfer, please

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and to get more spin from swing speed training, click here.