Tag Archives: golf equipment




By Paul Myers

Are you a golfer that automatically reaches for the driver as soon as you get to the tee on a par four or par five? It’s okay to admit it – you are certainly among the majority. However, you might be better served to employ a two-golf-club approach to your game off the tee. When you have two options, your driver and one other club (even another driver designed for a different type of shot), you may be more able to make good decisions and get your ball in play in an ideal position as often as possible. Sure you may sacrifice some distance by using another golf club on some holes, but as long as you aren’t giving up too much distance you can be rewarded with better accuracy and fewer balls in trouble or lost for penalty shots.

Picking which golf club you are going to use as your other primary driving club should be pretty easy. The two most obvious options are either your three wood, or your favorite hybrid golf club. The three wood will provide the most distance of all of your other clubs aside from the driver, while you might have the better control over the hybrid. Think about your comfort level with either of these clubs and decide on the one that you like best.

If you want to do a second driver, you might build one for a fade and one for a draw, one for distance and one for accuracy, etc.

When do you pull the driver?

Of course, you may still want to hit your driver(s) as frequently as possible while making good decisions. You don’t have to shy away from hitting the driver all round long, but be smart about it at the same time. On a short par four with a narrow fairway, there really is nothing gained by hitting the driver, so why take the risk when there’s a great chance of getting in trouble? Use your other golf club and get the ball safely in play to set up a good approach shot.

A good rule of thumb for making golf club decisions off the tee is looking at what you will gain by hitting the driver, and work backward from there. The most obvious answer is distance, so on long holes, the driver will usually be the right choice. As long as you have enough room to hit the driver comfortably, and have a little margin for error with your target, swing away with confidence.

Not All Driver Swings are the Same

In addition to using another golf club off the tee from time to time based on the kind of hole that you are playing, you should also understand that not every driver swing has to be 100% max effort. In fact, you would benefit from taking some less-aggressive swings with your driver on holes where you don’t need your full distance to set up a good approach. Practice on the driving range taking swings at something less than full speed to get used to the idea of hitting an ‘easy’ driver down the fairway.

For that matter, possibly no golfer can swing at 100% and hit the ball consistently well. Maybe going 90-95% would be better. Some professional speed golfers can hit their drivers at many speeds. They don’t carry a full bag of clubs, so they need to be able to hit the driver at different distances. It’s a good skill to have.

Anyway, you don’t have to have a huge repertoire off the tee, but even just having one additional golf club (beyond your driver) that you are comfortable with or being able to hit the driver at various speeds could be a huge help. That way, when you step on each par four or par five tee, you can pick the best shot, pick a target, and hit a smart shot.

If you liked the article about using a two golf club combination for optimal driving performance and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

The decisions you make regarding your golf equipment don’t stop with the clubs that are in your bag. The golf ball you decide to play with is important, and if you want to get the best possible performance from your swing and your game, it’s great if the golf ball matches your skills. A golf ball that isn’t a good match for your swing can ruin all of the hard work that you have put into your swing, and leave you frustrated as to what is going wrong.

One mistake that is made by some amateur golfers is simply choosing a golf ball because they see it being used on television by their favorite golfer. Your swing probably isn’t very similar to that of your favorite player, so copying their choice of ball is probably not a good strategy. It’s better to pick a ball based on your particular skills and swing characteristics, not those of someone else.

Can You Handle the Spin?

Generally speaking, the more expensive a golf ball is, the more it will spin. Of course, that is not a hard and fast rule. If you are looking at top-of-the-line tour model golf balls, you can expect them to offer high spin rates. Is that a good thing? Well, it depends on whether or not you are able to control that spin and use it to your advantage.

An accomplished golfer who can control their ball flight should probably use a high-spin ball because it allows them to stop the ball quicker on the greens and provides for more feel on chip shots and putts. Nearly every professional golfer uses a quality ball that will spin and that fits their game.

The downside of that spin is that it can make your bad shots worse. For example, if you are a golfer who tends to fight a slice, a high-spin (expensive) golf ball could make your slice worse. Many golfers have been frustrated after purchasing an expensive box of golf balls only to see their performance suffer as a result. The simply reality is that not all golfers are good enough to use such a golf ball. It just doesn’t fit their game. A lower-spin, and possibly less-expensive, golf ball may be the better choice for players who aren’t yet able to manage their ball flight consistently swing after swing.

Trial and Error is Key

Just like when you are shopping for a new driver, testing out golf ball options for yourself is a way to find the right one to add to your bag. A reputable club fitter can help you decide on which type of ball may be best for you. But you never really know how a ball will perform until you actually hit it with your club under real on-course conditions. Instead of investing in a full dozen golf balls just to try them out, see if you can find sleeves of three balls for sale in a variety of brands and models that you or your club fitter think will fit your game. After a period of trying them all out, it will probably become clear quite quickly which one is the best match for your game.

If you liked the article about how important is to pick the right golf ball to suit your swing and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




by Jaacob Bowden

I don’t know how many times I’ve been in a custom club fitters shop and watched him customize and fit clubs, but I’ve never actually got to do any of it myself until last week.

I have a set of 1irons that I’ve really enjoyed, but I shelfed them in January since the shafts were too flexible for me and they weren’t oriented in the most stable position. Since then I’ve been playing some Wishon 555Cs and Vega wedges.

However, recently my friend Ric Moore sent me some new Jumbo Chamois grips and some True Temper Dynamic Gold SL X-100s with the spines marked.  I also got some Sensicore inserts to put down the new shafts to dampen vibration and make it easier on my joints.

I took all the new stuff over to a local Swiss shop, and my friend Adam let me do a lot of the tweaks with him.  We pulled the old 1iron shafts out, cleaned them up, reglued them, let them dry, put the Sensicore inserts in, cut the shafts and put the new grips on.  Then we checked all the loft and lie angles to make sure they were right (amazingly the lies were spot on…and the lofts were good too except for 3 clubs being 1/2 degree off and 1 club being one degree off).

Now I’m all ready to put the 1iron irons back in play…and I’ll use the Wishon 555Cs as a backup set.  😎

It was a fun way to spend a couple of afternoons.  🙂

If you liked the article about golf equipment and you think it would help another golfer, please

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products, click here.