Tag Archives: golf distance




By Paul Myers

The title of this article might sound like a stupid question, but there is actually more to this discussion meets the eye. Obviously, you would rather have your ball finish in the golf fairway than in the rough, but at what cost? Should you always place a premium on getting on the short grass, or are there some situations where the rough would be okay as long as you get plenty of distance? The more you start the think about this topic, the more interesting it becomes.

There are generally two schools of thought on this question – those who think that the golf fairway should always be the goal, and those who think distance can trump accuracy. Let’s take a closer look at each of those two arguments.

The Argument for Accuracy

Golf shots are generally easier to control when they are hit from the golf fairway – that much we know, and can probably agree on. When the club is able to strike the ball cleanly with no long rough between the ball and the face of the club, the golfer has maximum control over the ball flight that results. Bad shots under these conditions can’t be blamed on the grass getting in the way – it is all on the golfer (unless you may have been in a divot or something like that). Therefore, putting the ball into the golf fairway is the ultimate goal for each and every tee shot.

This argument will hold the perspective that the extra yards gained by being more aggressive off the tee aren’t a benefit when the next shot has to be hit from the rough. For instance, a shot played from 150 yards to the green from the golf fairway just might be easier to deal with than a shot from 125 yards out of the rough. If the golfer is able to get closer from 150 in the fairway on a consistent basis, then it would seem they are better off playing for position.

The Argument for Distance

Closer is always better is the argument that this group will hold. It is much easier to get close to the hole when you are closer to the green, even if the shot has to be played from the rough. The equipment golfers use today allows for shots from the rough to be spun enough to hold most greens, so the golf fairway advantage may not as significant as it used to be. As long as the drive leaves the player with a clear shot at the green, it doesn’t really matter what kind of lie the player has.

The Verdict

As with most arguments, the truth is somewhere in between the two extremes in this debate, provided you aren’t giving up more than 25 yards or so of distance by being in the fairway (beyond that point, it’s normally better on average to be farther down the hole). The right choice for any individual hole, and player, depends on a number of factors. If a course has deep rough, then playing for the golf fairway might be the best choice. On a long course with light rough lining the fairways in which the style of rough could “tee” the ball up and not really have a bad lie, the aggressive club selection off the tee could be justified and work out best in the long run. You will need to assess your own game and course and decide what kind of strategy you are most comfortable with. Don’t be afraid to adjust that strategy as you go to suit the conditions that you are playing in, and the course you are playing on. Over time, you will get more comfortable with your decision making and the choices you make on the tee will become second nature.

If you liked the article about hitting the golf fairway and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

Finding the optimal launch angle and golf ball flight for your driver can be a constant battle that can have a lot to do with how much distance you actually achieve on the course. Even if you have great club head speed with your driver swing, you might not get the most possible distance from the shot if your club isn’t producing optimal launch conditions. Of course, there is some debate about what kind of launch is actually best, and what will work best on the course in actually playing conditions.

High Drives = Long Carry

Sometimes, players will try to maximize their carry distance so that they can hit the golf ball plenty long even when the course gets soft. It is conceivable that if you wish to get the most distance out of your driver at all times, going for a higher launch and higher golf ball flight might be the right way to go. You will be able to carry some hazards out in the fairway, and could even consider cutting off a dogleg with a high drive that clears the trees without rolling through the fairway. However, there can be a price to pay for this strategy.

High drives have their drawbacks as well. Consider the following three points that might have you leaning more toward using a lower golf ball flight as your preferred trajectory.

  • Control. The longer the golf ball is in the air, the less control you have over where it is going. SA shot that is only a couple degrees off line can continue to get farther and farther from the fairway the longer it is in the air. If you get the ball down on the ground earlier, you can limit the damage that you experience from an off line shot, and you will may notice that you find fewer and fewer penalty shots around the course. That doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t go high…just make sure you allow for the wind’s affect on the ball from the extra time in the air.
  • Managing conditions. When the weather turns against you, whether it be rain or wind, or both, hitting a high ball off the tee can become a real problem. A good golfer is able to play well in a variety of weather conditions, and that could be problematic for you if the high drive is the only one your club is capable of hitting. Being able to flight the golf ball lower when the conditions get ugly is an ability that can be highly valuable when it is needed.
  • Loss of strategy. By using a driver that is designed and tuned to hit the golf ball high and long on each swing, you may compromise on strategy off the tee and have to adjust the ball flights that you wish to use on each hole. Taking this one size fits all approach to tee shots might work well on some courses and conditions, but may be less effective on other courses.

Ultimately, it will be up to you to choose which kind of golf ball flight you are most comfortable with on the courses that you play. There is certainly an argument to be made that a high ball flight can work well off the tee – but there are some drawbacks as well. Experiment with your equipment and swing to create different golf ball flights with your driver and settle on the one that makes you the most comfortable and gives you the best results.

If you liked the article about hitting the golf ball high or not and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

It is common knowledge among golfers that golf draws go further than golf fades do. Well, it is assumed to be common knowledge – but is it actually true? It seems like many long hitters and TOUR players play a draw, but that is not a hard and fast rule. In fact, Bubba Watson, one of the longest of the long hitters on the PGA Tour, is well-known for his lefty golf fade that seems to fly forever. Obviously, as he has proved with his high club head speed, it is certainly possible to bomb it off the tee while hitting a golf fade. Jason Zuback, 4-time RE/MAX World Long Drive Champion, has also been know to fade the ball as well.

Draws Usually Go Further – But Not Necessarily in the Air

By the nature of hitting a golf draw, you are taking the club into the back of the ball from an inside position. You are hitting slightly from the inside out, to deliver power to the ball and possibly generate more distance. However, it isn’t necessarily that simple.

Assuming the same launch angle and other conditions, if you tilt the spin axis the same amount either one way, the distance for a fade or draw will end up being the same.

However, in most cases, draws and fades using the same club do not launch at the same angle.  A shot hit with draw spin will usually launch lower and not have as much backspin as a fade , therefore it might not stay in the air as long. You might end up with more distance out of your draw, but some of that distance will be accounted for in the bounce and roll of the ball. If you are looking for pure carry distance, a golf fade might have more to offer.

That being said, if you work with a club fitter and you alter your impact conditions slightly (for example, getting the right loft on your club to adjust your spin down and then tweak your angle of attack and swing direction), it’s possible to maximize carry distance with a fade, straight shot, or draw.

You Can Talk to a Golf Fade, but a Hook Won’t Listen

When you play a draw, there is the risk of it turning into a hook – and a hook is one shot you may not recover from. A low hooked tee shot will sometimes keep turning, and bouncing, until it finds some kind of trouble. Because of this, many draw players are always living in fear of hitting a hook – and making the double bogey or worse that can come with it.

On the other side of the coin, most fades don’t turn into slices that are quite as disastrous. Since the golf fade will usually have a little more backspin and launch higher, the ball will land more steeply won’t run away as far or as fast once on the ground. Simply put, unless you have a really low-lofted driver and you intentionally bring your spin and launch way down to optimize distance for fades, you typically have less distance but more margin for error off the tee when you play a golf fade as opposed to a draw.

Do What Comes Natural

While it is a valuable skill to work on controlling different ball flights off the tee, for scoring, you might go back to what you know and what you trust when the pressure is on. If you are naturally a golfer that hits a slight draw, trust that shot and use it the majority of the time. It can be useful to have a golf fade available for certain situations, but it’s usually best to return to your trusty draw when you need to hit a good one. There is just no substitute for what feels natural.

To answer the title question, yes, you can maximize distance while hitting a golf fade. There are plenty of powerful players on the PGA Tour who make the golf fade their shot of choice, because they can control it and still get plenty of distance at the same time through proper club fitting and optimization of their launch conditions. If you are naturally a golfer who hits a golf fade, it may be best not to fight it – work with a club fitter to get a head that gets your spin and launch right to maximize golf fade distance, and hit the best golf fade you can.

If you liked the article, which is answering the question ‘Can you maximize distance and still play a golf fade?’ and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

It can be a great feeling to go in for a swing analysis or club fitting and light up the machine with impressive swing speed numbers. You can brag to your buddies about your lightning-quick swing, and look forward to hitting those long drives down the middle of the fairway on the impressive golf distance. There may only one problem – you aren’t seeing those long drives fly down the middle of the fairway on the golf distance that is needed. Instead, your drives are landing well short of your playing partners, even though you have them beat in terms of swing speed.

Just because you can impress the radar gun, doesn’t mean you are automatically going to hit long drives. There are more variables in play than just speed, so some tuning to the rest of your swing may be needed if you want to convert your potential into actual power.

Center of the Club Face

If there is one element that is great to execute time and time again when hitting your driver, it is matching the middle of the club face to the back of the ball…hitting it on the sweet spot. The maximum power will be transferred from your club to the ball when you hit the sweet spot, so that is exactly what you probably want to do. If you make contact out by the toe, or in off the heel, you are going to lose much of that power you worked so hard to create. Not only that, but the shot is more likely to be off line as well. A good swing and solid balance can be key in order to make reliable contact shot after shot.

Lose the Side Spin

The more golf distance a ball travels sideways in the air, the less golf distance it travels down the fairway. In order to get the most golf distance from your drives, you need to take as much sidespin off of the ball as possible. In fact, in the Swing Man Golf member area there are some ideal spin numbers to achieve based on your club head speed and whether you want to optimize for carry or total distance.

Coming into impact with a clubface square to your swing path will help you limit sidespin and can help give you the best possible energy transfer. If you can only pick one or the other, a swing that is on path with a square club face is more or less preferred over a faster swing with a poor position at impact that hits the ball all over the planet.

Get the Right Equipment

Another common way to lose golf distance off your drives even with a fast swing speed is playing a driver that is not well-matched to your game. For maximum distance, it’s important to optimize your equipment by going through a club fitting process with a trained professional. Getting the right club (including head and shaft) that will play to your strength and creating good launch conditions is vital to maximizing yards on your drives. Club fitting sessions are worth the price, and some golf shops will refund your fee if you wind up buying a driver from them after the fitting is complete. Going through this extra step to fine-tune your driver might be a little more work than just ordering a club online, but you will likely be rewarded in the end.

If you liked the article about how to translate your swing speed into actual golf distance and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Swing Man Golf Staff

Here is the second video of the series “Getting Fit for Distance”. Jaacob Bowden talks more about finding a good driver length for you. Most driver lengths sold at golf stores are 45″ to 46″ inches but that is not always the most appropriate length for everyone.

Find out how to determine what length will work for you in this video.

Check out our brand new Swing Man Golf YouTube Channel.

You can subscribe for FREE to the channel here!!!

If you liked the article about getting fit for golf distance and you think it would help another golfer, please

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products, click here.




By Swing Man Golf Staff

A lot of you want to hit the golf ball further.  It has become one of the most talked about subjects in golf of late and will continue to be in conversation with courses becoming increasingly longer.  But a lot of you don’t have the right equipment to maximize or optimize the most out of your swing.  Here is the first video of a series from Jaacob Bowden that will help you pick the right driver to get the most distance out of your swing.

Check out our brand new Swing Man Golf YouTube Channel.

You can subscribe for FREE to the channel here

If you liked the article about getting fit for golf distance and you think it would help another golfer, please

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products, click here.