Tag Archives: golf ball




By Paul Myers

Finding the optimal launch angle and golf ball flight for your driver can be a constant battle that can have a lot to do with how much distance you actually achieve on the course. Even if you have great club head speed with your driver swing, you might not get the most possible distance from the shot if your club isn’t producing optimal launch conditions. Of course, there is some debate about what kind of launch is actually best, and what will work best on the course in actually playing conditions.

High Drives = Long Carry

Sometimes, players will try to maximize their carry distance so that they can hit the golf ball plenty long even when the course gets soft. It is conceivable that if you wish to get the most distance out of your driver at all times, going for a higher launch and higher golf ball flight might be the right way to go. You will be able to carry some hazards out in the fairway, and could even consider cutting off a dogleg with a high drive that clears the trees without rolling through the fairway. However, there can be a price to pay for this strategy.

High drives have their drawbacks as well. Consider the following three points that might have you leaning more toward using a lower golf ball flight as your preferred trajectory.

  • Control. The longer the golf ball is in the air, the less control you have over where it is going. SA shot that is only a couple degrees off line can continue to get farther and farther from the fairway the longer it is in the air. If you get the ball down on the ground earlier, you can limit the damage that you experience from an off line shot, and you will may notice that you find fewer and fewer penalty shots around the course. That doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t go high…just make sure you allow for the wind’s affect on the ball from the extra time in the air.
  • Managing conditions. When the weather turns against you, whether it be rain or wind, or both, hitting a high ball off the tee can become a real problem. A good golfer is able to play well in a variety of weather conditions, and that could be problematic for you if the high drive is the only one your club is capable of hitting. Being able to flight the golf ball lower when the conditions get ugly is an ability that can be highly valuable when it is needed.
  • Loss of strategy. By using a driver that is designed and tuned to hit the golf ball high and long on each swing, you may compromise on strategy off the tee and have to adjust the ball flights that you wish to use on each hole. Taking this one size fits all approach to tee shots might work well on some courses and conditions, but may be less effective on other courses.

Ultimately, it will be up to you to choose which kind of golf ball flight you are most comfortable with on the courses that you play. There is certainly an argument to be made that a high ball flight can work well off the tee – but there are some drawbacks as well. Experiment with your equipment and swing to create different golf ball flights with your driver and settle on the one that makes you the most comfortable and gives you the best results.

If you liked the article about hitting the golf ball high or not and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




By Paul Myers

The decisions you make regarding your golf equipment don’t stop with the clubs that are in your bag. The golf ball you decide to play with is important, and if you want to get the best possible performance from your swing and your game, it’s great if the golf ball matches your skills. A golf ball that isn’t a good match for your swing can ruin all of the hard work that you have put into your swing, and leave you frustrated as to what is going wrong.

One mistake that is made by some amateur golfers is simply choosing a golf ball because they see it being used on television by their favorite golfer. Your swing probably isn’t very similar to that of your favorite player, so copying their choice of ball is probably not a good strategy. It’s better to pick a ball based on your particular skills and swing characteristics, not those of someone else.

Can You Handle the Spin?

Generally speaking, the more expensive a golf ball is, the more it will spin. Of course, that is not a hard and fast rule. If you are looking at top-of-the-line tour model golf balls, you can expect them to offer high spin rates. Is that a good thing? Well, it depends on whether or not you are able to control that spin and use it to your advantage.

An accomplished golfer who can control their ball flight should probably use a high-spin ball because it allows them to stop the ball quicker on the greens and provides for more feel on chip shots and putts. Nearly every professional golfer uses a quality ball that will spin and that fits their game.

The downside of that spin is that it can make your bad shots worse. For example, if you are a golfer who tends to fight a slice, a high-spin (expensive) golf ball could make your slice worse. Many golfers have been frustrated after purchasing an expensive box of golf balls only to see their performance suffer as a result. The simply reality is that not all golfers are good enough to use such a golf ball. It just doesn’t fit their game. A lower-spin, and possibly less-expensive, golf ball may be the better choice for players who aren’t yet able to manage their ball flight consistently swing after swing.

Trial and Error is Key

Just like when you are shopping for a new driver, testing out golf ball options for yourself is a way to find the right one to add to your bag. A reputable club fitter can help you decide on which type of ball may be best for you. But you never really know how a ball will perform until you actually hit it with your club under real on-course conditions. Instead of investing in a full dozen golf balls just to try them out, see if you can find sleeves of three balls for sale in a variety of brands and models that you or your club fitter think will fit your game. After a period of trying them all out, it will probably become clear quite quickly which one is the best match for your game.

If you liked the article about how important is to pick the right golf ball to suit your swing and you think it would help another golfer, please like it.

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products and hit it longer with swing speed training, click here.

And, if you would like to add 30 to 40 yards to your drives over the next 30 days, like thousands of our customers have before you, you might consider our unique Swing Man Golf Swing Speed Training.

Use the tool below to find out a.) how fast your swing speed should be and b.) how fast you COULD swing it soon:

 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU DRIVE IT? HOW FAR COULD YOU DRIVE IT?

…based on gender, age, handicap and average driving distance? Use this tool to find out:

Male Female

 




Q&A with Jaacob Bowden

Question:

Besides not having very good swing speed, I also push and fade the ball.  My problem isn’t just swing speed, it’s squaring and releasing the clubface.  Are there any items that would help that come with your program?

Jaacob’s Answer:

The Swing Man Golf site can definitely help you with your swing speed.  Most people have a cruise speed (one that they use on the golf course) and a maximum speed.  We work with raising and training your maximum speed, so that when you back off to your cruise speed, it will feel like you are exerting the same amount of effort.  However, because we raised your baseline, your cruise speed will be much higher than before.  In the first 30 days with the twice-weekly Basic Program, typically I hear back about 12-16 mph (30-40 yard) driver swing speed gains.

I’m not so sure we need to change your back swing length.  The length of swing that you are currently making gets you the best contact…and good contact is important.  You can lose significant distance on your drives just by missing the sweet spot by an inch.

As for the little push fade, here are several things that you might try to help get the club back square at impact.

1)  If you don’t already have one, get a driver whose face is a degree or two closed…and/or one of the adjustable-weight drivers that is draw-biased.
2)  Start the club head out slightly closed at setup.
3)  Make your grip slightly stronger, i.e. turn your hands a little bit more clock-wise (assuming the you are a right-hander).
4)  Don’t open the club face up so much on the back swing.

If you liked the article about the pushing or fading the golf ball and you think it would help another golfer, please

 

To learn more about Swing Man Golf products, click here.